Subtractive colour mixing web tool

hydroform

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Mar 10, 2013
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Thought people might find this interesting/useful for estimating primary colour dye quantities. I know that yellow is 'overpowered' by magenta and cyan, but taking into account that more yellow may be required, this might give a nice first guess.

.

Click the 'Illustration' tab and set to 'subtractive' for paint/dye mixing.


Gary.

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Cap'n Fishy

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Thought people might find this interesting/useful for estimating primary colour dye quantities. I know that yellow is 'overpowered' by magenta and cyan, but taking into account that more yellow may be required, this might give a nice first guess.

.

Click the 'Illustration' tab and set to 'subtractive' for paint/dye mixing.


Gary.

Sent from my CPH1931 using Tapatalk

Interesting link, Gary. Thanks for posting. I'm sure it will have its uses. Also interesting it lists CMY as the primaries in paints and dyes. Most folk who are up on their dyeing insist that Red-Blue-Yellow are the primary colours for dyes and paints. I came to it after working with digital cameras and Photoshop, where RGB are the primaries (as with light transmission/additive colours), and CMY(K) are the primary colours of printing inks.

The dye folks like to use things like this...

primary-secondary-and-intermediate-colors.png
Color_star-en_%28tertiary_names%29.svg



But, coming at it from photography and printing, I am happy to work in CMYK. I have pure cyan, magenta, yellow and black dyes and have done a few different mixes using only those 4, based on CMYK 'recipes'. The advantage is that you can get CMYK values for anything in Photoshop just by hovering the colour-picker over it...

Jay blue...



Heather fly legs...



I have done a few dye mixes based on taking a CMYK reading in Photoshop to give me a starting recipe. I got a nice kingfisher blue that way. Even used my own kingfisher photo - so I could trust the colours on it 😜...

Botanics20Dec19_4581.jpg




However, it is by no means foolproof. One problem is that different dyes strike at different rates, and occupy available sites and effectively block out the slower striking colours. And different materials take dyes differently. If you put 10 pieces of roe deer hair into a dye bath, you will get 10 different results. I tried to do claret seal's fur using a CMYK mix and it came out nothing like claret! :oops:

In the same way that many printing ink systems include a grey to make things easier than relying on black as the 'Key', I have found both blue dun and iron blue dun useful additions to my CMYK system. I did a sooty olive cape using only yellow and blue dun on a white cape...



But it is always good fun to experiment with these things and you learn something every time you do it. (y)

Col
 

hydroform

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Joined
Mar 10, 2013
Messages
20
Really cool Col.
How are you converting the values on photoshop to recipes? Just use the numbers as ratios?
What dyes are you using? These seem really reasonable:

Is the blue dun veniard?

Gary.

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Cap'n Fishy

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Really cool Col.
How are you converting the values on photoshop to recipes? Just use the numbers as ratios?
What dyes are you using? These seem really reasonable:

Is the blue dun veniard?

Gary.

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Cheers, Gary. I'm wary of when a CMYK value is given as 100%, as it is 'maxing-out' and might be difficult to translate into ratios when weighing the others. But basically, yes, I use them as ratios, and then weigh-out each in mg on a jewellery balance.

Sources...

Yes.. the blue dun and iron blue dun I have are Veniard's in glass bottles, dating from the 1970s! The others are more modern, though some of them are also Veniard's.

For Cyan, Jacquard Turquoise is really good.
For Magenta, try Jacquard Hot Fuchsia
For Yellow, I mostly use this... (pick 'sample' pack size)
For Black, any one can have a blue or red cast, but an equal mix of Veniard and Jacquard blacks tend to give a neutral black. (y)

Most of my dyes are either Veniard or Jacquard.

Cheers,
Col
 

sabalos

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Mar 5, 2008
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That was the register marks
CMYK had been used for years by then. And is only an industrial standard built from years of invention and progress in substrates and pigments.
The most accurate measure is the LAB reading which is a 3 dimensional measure of colour.
CYMK came in with computing
RGB is the colourway for most screens and monitors
 
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