Sucessful hook up.

conutskwoky

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Apr 17, 2007
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69
I am still fairly new to fly fishing with just 1 season under my belt, and despite I have caught a few fish, things are still very tough for me.:(
I wear polarised sunglasses when I am fishing (no matter boat or bank). Some say that you should be concentrate on fishing, looking at your fly line for takes or pulls. But I don't know why I can't seem to hook the fish when I am looking at the fly line. I managed to hook fish suceessfully when i am looking away,(watching what others doing, looking down at the fly line or even closing my eyes.) but i still miss alot of takes.:mad:

Is there any ways that I could do to have more sucessful hook ups, what I should do? or even anything I could do to train for better reflex?
 

BOF39

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May 31, 2006
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71
Location
Swindon
It can be tough to get the timing right with striking, after a while you will probably just get the knack for it without knowing what you're doing differently. Try different timings, its difficult but wait a breath between seeing the take and striking and see if that helps. it sounds like you do better when you strike late rather than early.

You don't say if your lake or river fishing but I assume lake. Could you be retreiving too fast or erratic, not allowing the fish to get a good bite at the fly ? as I imagine you slow down when you are looking around and not paying attention.

I'm clutching at straws realy but hopefully it may give you some ideas.

Cheers
 

Alan B

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May 17, 2006
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In Exile in Keighley (its getting worse) W. Yo....
Is there any ways that I could do to have more successful hook ups, what I should do? or even anything I could do to train for better reflex?

Something we would all like to do. If you detect 1 take in 10 you are doing very well. I once stood on a jetty, and watched a fish take each fly in a team of three then turn and take the first two again then swim off without the angler noticing anything.

The main thing is don't give up. Keep on and things will improve. I have had very few opportunities to fish over the last 2 years (comparatively) and can feel how dull I have become. The only real way to improve is to keep on fishing. It is amazing how sharp you can become with a lot of fishing.

For now if it doesn't help to look at your line then don't. A friend of mine never did until I showed him the black art of the upstream nymph. He now watches his line like a hawk. But he knows what he is watching for! This is something I can't tell you in words. John Gierach summed up in Trout Bum when he wrote in Zen and the Art of Nymph Fishing:
Student: "Master, how does one know when the trout takes the fly?"
Master: "The moon is reflected in the deep pool, my son."
That is about as close as anyone has ever gotten to capturing in words how you know when you get a take.

One thing that might help is, I do not use the term "Strike" to describe my reaction when I get a take. I consider that I "tighten" into the fish. Usually by lifting the rod. It isn't as violent as many of the "strikes" I see done by others. It is just an upward sweep of the rod, accompanied, if I have a lot of line out, by a stripping of the line with my other hand.

To quote again, this time from the back cover of H2G2, "Don't Panic", keep going and the more you do the better this part will get. It is the most difficult part of fishing to teach. The way to learn is to go out and do it. I'm sure you'll get there.

Cheers
Alan.
 

IanH

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May 17, 2006
Messages
396
Are you sure that your hooks are sharp?

You seem to be talking about still water. I don't do a lot of still water fishing now but if I was fishing wet fly with a slow retrieve then I found the fish hooked themselves - just needed to lift the rod when I felt a pull.

Watching the tip of the line might give you a "get ready" warning but the fish should hook itself on the pull. You just need to lift the rod and keep the line tight from then on to stop the hook dropping out.

I'm trying to master up steam nymphing at the moment. As Alan says it isn't easy - I've resorted to an indicator till I get my eye in.
 

E. Vulgata

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Feb 7, 2007
Messages
481
Location
Dorchester
If it is stillwater nymphing you are doing, try watching the leader where it enters the water, not the flyline.

Feel for the fish if you think something has changed but haven't seen anything, it costs nothing and if you do as Richard Walker used to say, just "lift the rod and feel for the fish", you can carry on with the retrieve if there is nothing there.



:cool:
 

conutskwoky

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Joined
Apr 17, 2007
Messages
69
I do mean fishing stillwater, as I found that fly fishing at rivers is a bit expensive because I am just a student. But i am sure it is very exciting as you can watch the takes. I usually fish buzzers and damsels very slowly. But when things are not going well, i will put on a bigger lure to tempt the fish. usually i will get some takes, i fish them start and stop and mixed retrieve
 

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