Tackle shops re opening

ohanzee

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I think it's out of necessity, Loop (like Hardy and Loomis) has a minimum order policy that is unattainable to small and medium tackle shops that aren't specialised in fly fishing gear. What's left are a couple of shops with exclusivity contracts for large areas. That doesn't boost sales, hence the direct approach which automatically sets a lowest selling price for smaller distributors to adhere to. In a shrinking market I suppose it's the only solution to several problems.

Minimum orders control small tackle shops, often done by extending credit so when a shop puts in an order and its a big chunk of their monthly stock investment they can be struggling to fill the order, result - in the UK all they sell is Greys, and they continue because they didn't sell last months order and are still in credit, customer now wants the choice they see on the internet and not to choose from only one maker/supplier.

The other problem is customers want to look at it, weigh it in the hand, see it in the flesh, as questions and take up the small shop owners time and experience, then compare prices online to get it cheaper.

Bait and permits, flies, maggots, cheap consumable terminal tackle is the queue, sometimes another service, and if you are lucky covers the rates during the season, the winter is just trying to stay open with a spin at xmas.

The 'other service' is where small shops can survive I'd say.
 

Rhithrogena

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collectively the west needs to realign our business dealings
A noble cause indeed, but I'm interested in how best you think we can achieve this? Surely we in the west need manufacturing capability before we burn our bridges with China? We will need to stop buying oil from those oil rich nations too, holding us to ransom over oil prices, and funding terrorism with the proceeds. Oh, and we will need to stop selling arms to fundamentalist regimes whilst we are at it...
I agree with your stance that aspects of Chinese government policy are abhorrent. Past aspects of British government have been uniquely abhorrent too. The world is one big mess. The west has been instrumental in creating this. We have made our bed and if we don't want to lie in it we need to learn to cope with a long period of chaos and deprivation to effect true global reform. This will need the agreement and cooperation of all nations.
Not very likely to happen I should think...but I live in hope that my young children will see a harmonised world.
 

lhomme

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Minimum orders control small tackle shops, often done by extending credit so when a shop puts in an order and its a big chunk of their monthly stock investment they can be struggling to fill the order, result - in the UK all they sell is Greys, and they continue because they didn't sell last months order and are still in credit, customer now wants the choice they see on the internet and not to choose from only one maker/supplier.

The other problem is customers want to look at it, weigh it in the hand, see it in the flesh, as questions and take up the small shop owners time and experience, then compare prices online to get it cheaper.

Bait and permits, flies, maggots, cheap consumable terminal tackle is the queue, sometimes another service, and if you are lucky covers the rates during the season, the winter is just trying to stay open with a spin at xmas.

The 'other service' is where small shops can survive I'd say.
It's a knife that cuts both ways. Small and medium tackle shops have no interest in selling (expensive) premium fly fishing brands, demand is not high enough to cover the long term investment. A steady turnover of cheaper gear and small tackle is what they need to stay afloat.
On the other hand you have the big players still profiling their top brands as exclusivities (Shimano/Loomis and Pure Fishing/Hardy) and other manufacturers like Loop, Sage and Simms follow that line of thinking. They like their gear to be sold by specialised retailers or they'll do it themselves. That obviously narrows down the possibilities and other means of distribution need to fill the void. Fly-fairs seem to be the places where premium brands (often represented by an exclusive dealer) offer the customers the means to discover and even try out their products. From there on the customer can decide where to buy what, but both he and the manufacturers know the advice given with the try-out was top notch. That is as important to these expensive brands as visible representation, be it at public events or near the waterside.
 
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blithfield2

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A noble cause indeed, but I'm interested in how best you think we can achieve this? Surely we in the west need manufacturing capability before we burn our bridges with China? We will need to stop buying oil from those oil rich nations too, holding us to ransom over oil prices, and funding terrorism with the proceeds. Oh, and we will need to stop selling arms to fundamentalist regimes whilst we are at it...
I agree with your stance that aspects of Chinese government policy are abhorrent. Past aspects of British government have been uniquely abhorrent too. The world is one big mess. The west has been instrumental in creating this. We have made our bed and if we don't want to lie in it we need to learn to cope with a long period of chaos and deprivation to effect true global reform. This will need the agreement and cooperation of all nations.
Not very likely to happen I should think...but I live in hope that my young children will see a harmonised world.
There is no magic wand and clearly we cannot carry out all the above at the same time but more importantly we should not be leaving it to the following generation to solve. First thing I would do is impose Import tariffs on everything coming in from china - something that is missing at the moment.
 

ohanzee

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It's a knife that cuts both ways. Small and medium tackle shops have no interest in selling (expensive) premium fly fishing brands, demand is not high enough to cover the long term investment. A steady turnover of cheaper gear and small tackle is what they need to stay afloat.
On the other hand you have the big players still profiling their top brands as exclusivities (Shimano/Loomis and Pure Fishing/Hardy) and other manufacturers like Loop, Sage and Simms follow that line of thinking. They like their gear to be sold by specialised retailers or they'll do it themselves. That obviously narrows down the possibilities and other means of distribution need to fill the void. Fly-fairs seem to be the places where premium brands (often represented by an exclusive dealer) offer the customers the means to discover and even try out their products. From there on the customer can decide where to buy what, but both he and the manufacturers know the advice given with the try-out was top notch. That is as important to these expensive brands as visible representation, be it at public events or near the waterside.

Each of these things is a factor, but in the UK we still hanker for the old tackle shop that statistically we obviously don't support(or they would be thriving) its a catch 22, we want a friendly old tackle counter with flies in a class drawer but we don't want to pay for it.

Meanwhile the suppliers that the tackle shop buys from are speaking directly to us with much better advice and guidance, and choice, starts with big items like rods, reels and clothing and the small shop is now half empty or it has racks of things that suddenly don't sell anymore because we buy that direct.

Really all that a small tackle shop has to offer is familiarity and atmosphere, the red telephone boxes of fishing retail.
 

ohanzee

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There is no magic wand and clearly we cannot carry out all the above at the same time but more importantly we should not be leaving it to the following generation to solve. First thing I would do is impose Import tariffs on everything coming in from china - something that is missing at the moment.

And pay more for practically everything? genius, with economics like that you could be brexit minister :)

Encouraging UK manufacturing to stay in the UK 20 years ago might have helped, imposing tariffs on what effectively becomes UK retail, import and retail goods 20 years after unbolting the stable door and calling the horse global is reactionary economics.
 

campsiefisher

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Rhithrogena Today at 2:37 PM

Chinese government policy are abhorrent. Past aspects of British government have been uniquely abhorrent too.

===============

Most relevant part post I have read in the whole thread, While most appear to think no other country except China has ever had an appalling policy record. It's good to know your own country's history.

How about our decision to bomb civilian targets in WWII, or let's look at India then one of the richest countries in the world, and after 200 years of exploitation by the British empire reduced it to a third world poverty stricken nation, or look to China and how we shamefully traded them Opium for their goods, or Kenya, or to Ireland's famine, Concentration camps ? another proud British invention, Torture ? the list goes on many more examples are everywhere if you care to look, try reading Simon Webb or Ian Cobain John Newsinger.

Just don't tell People that because they buy a line from China they should be ashamed.

Best regards
Jim
 

JoeOh

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And pay more for practically everything? genius, with economics like that you could be brexit minister :)

Encouraging UK manufacturing to stay in the UK 20 years ago might have helped, imposing tariffs on what effectively becomes UK retail, import and retail goods 20 years after unbolting the stable door and calling the horse global is reactionary economics.
Dear Mr Oh (sorry....), what you say has many truths, and yes the small tackle shops, like pubs are declining. Our shop is getting by with the demand for expensive tackle and bait by the Carp brigade. Pole fishing, though still practised is not a money spinner these days, most holding onto their poles and repairing/ replacing sections as required, a service which is offered and popular. Broken rod sections replaced without question under the normal guarantee.
Though fly tackle not a good seller, we stock items from Fulling Mill, Drennan and can order easily from Airflow and Wychwood.
But to be honest, although our local custoners still come through the front door, expanding the mail order side has kept the business afloat during the lockdown and is still expanding. Still cannot wait till Tuesday when at last we have customers in the store, rather than Click & Collect and anonymous names on the Net.
Cheers All
 

ohanzee

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Dear Mr Oh (sorry....), what you say has many truths, and yes the small tackle shops, like pubs are declining. Our shop is getting by with the demand for expensive tackle and bait by the Carp brigade. Pole fishing, though still practised is not a money spinner these days, most holding onto their poles and repairing/ replacing sections as required, a service which is offered and popular. Broken rod sections replaced without question under the normal guarantee.
Though fly tackle not a good seller, we stock items from Fulling Mill, Drennan and can order easily from Airflow and Wychwood.
But to be honest, although our local custoners still come through the front door, expanding the mail order side has kept the business afloat during the lockdown and is still expanding. Still cannot wait till Tuesday when at last we have customers in the store, rather than Click & Collect and anonymous names on the Net.
Cheers All

I know a bicycle shop that is so outdated you wouldn't believe, its packed out every weekend and through the week they work late to fill orders for wheel building, you are guaranteed chat and coffee..if you make it, they do online orders but they call you by your first name and expect you to visit if you are passing, it would never survive without the wheel building, but the wheel building would never survive without the coffee, and the online would never work without the personal service, its a fragile formula but if you can make it work it defies modern market forces.
 

ohanzee

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That's the trouble with you pseudo marxists, you don't like pragmatic solutions

I'm glad you don't work for me, said the pseudo Marxist:D

If you want to revive British manufacturing start with protecting British intellectual property, if you can prevent international copying UK design would immediately not only lead the world(as it does now) it would also profit from it.

Then it doesn't matter where you make it.
 

lhomme

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Each of these things is a factor, but in the UK we still hanker for the old tackle shop that statistically we obviously don't support(or they would be thriving) its a catch 22, we want a friendly old tackle counter with flies in a class drawer but we don't want to pay for it.

Meanwhile the suppliers that the tackle shop buys from are speaking directly to us with much better advice and guidance, and choice, starts with big items like rods, reels and clothing and the small shop is now half empty or it has racks of things that suddenly don't sell anymore because we buy that direct.

Really all that a small tackle shop has to offer is familiarity and atmosphere, the red telephone boxes of fishing retail.

We still have some over here as well, Alan, but they are quickly disappearing. The only ones surviving like the shop of Albert Bigaré for instance are magnets for fly fishermen from far and near. Because they are run by passionate people with a lifelong reputation in the sector, and that passion is going to disappear with them as well. It's a sad loss, but a sign of the times and a taste of what's coming. Yes, the manufacturers may give us more detailed information about their own products, but the knowledgeable middleman, the seasoned angler, caster, rod builder like Bigaré will know exactly what you need when you talk to him. That practical expertise and genuine helpfulness will gradually be lost in the transition.
 

ohanzee

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We still have some over here as well, Alan, but they are quickly disappearing. The only ones surviving like the shop of Albert Bigaré for instance are magnets for fly fishermen from far and near. Because they are run by passionate people with a lifelong reputation in the sector, and that passion is going to disappear with them as well. It's a sad loss, but a sign of the times and a taste of what's coming. Yes, the manufacturers may give us more detailed information about their own products, but the knowledgeable middleman, the seasoned angler, caster, rod builder like Bigaré will know exactly what you need when you talk to him. That practical expertise and genuine helpfulness will gradually be lost in the transition.

As with here, our Bigare is 'Al' and when he goes the personality(and the bottle of liqueur beside the coffee pot) will go, these guys lived and breathed their business, they were in fact 'the business', its hard to fill those shoes.
 

glueman

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on the banks of the A5
And pay more for practically everything? genius, with economics like that you could be brexit minister :)

Encouraging UK manufacturing to stay in the UK 20 years ago might have helped, imposing tariffs on what effectively becomes UK retail, import and retail goods 20 years after unbolting the stable door and calling the horse global is reactionary economics.
Ohanzee more like 40 years ago
 

Jason 70

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I popped into Farlows today during lunch at work to pick up a couple of bits for this weekend, nice to be back in a tackle shop. A few other people shopping, but central London is still very quiet to the "normal".
 

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