Tactics used when there's a big wave?

speytime

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Does rough water put fish down
The clubs boatman told me it doesn't fish well with a big wave on it,

Is there any particular tactics you would use in rough/big wave conditions, it's in the pentland hills so windy weather is fairly common.
Thanks Al
 
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linkledger

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I have always found fish respond well in a big wave. Usually well up in the water. From a boat or the bank I like to cast across the wind. A good steady retrieve seems to work. But just keeping in touch with a team of buzzers as they go round with the wind I find often works as well. And some savage takes. I am talking about way down south though.
 

speytime

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When i was a lad I used a bubble float and flee, when I arrived to fish I was always happy to see a big wave.

I should mention there's no bank fishing or anchor in the boat, its drifting tactics only.
Al
 

diawl bach

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I love fishing a big wave, a couple of big hoppers or ginked up wets and a fast retrieve through the waves being my approach, fish appear out of nowhere to hammer them, usually plenty of missed swirls but more than enough hook ups to make it worthwhile.

Second choice if they're not right on top would be an intermediate and traditional wets, bibio, dunkeld and bushy top dropper which is fun but lacking in the visual appeal and excitement of fish chasing the wake of a dry fly.

The weather looks perfect for it today but hi-ho, hi-ho.
 

Wee Jimmy

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Does rough water put fish down
The clubs boatman told me it doesn't fish well with a big wave on it,

Is there any particular tactics you would use in rough/big wave conditions, it's in the pentland hills so windy weather is fairly common.
Thanks Al

Well here’s my take on it Al...generally speaking,we’ve become a nation of twiddlers and rough weather doesn’t suit twiddling tactics particularly well.

A good blow suits pulling tactics better.
 
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Gdog

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If you're fishing for wild trout, try 3 wets on a fast intermediate with a bushy fly on the top dropper. The intermediate keeps the flies sub surface and avoids swirls and missed takes that are experienced with a floater, a sink tip is another choice if the trout want the flies slightly higher in the water. Use flies appropriate for the water for the time of year, for September try black or claret flies, but experiment with colours and fly sizes, sometimes size 10 will be best in a strong blow, but on some waters size 12's will work better. If its a bright day try a Doobry or Wickhams on the top dropper, a claret or pearly dabbler is also a very useful fly. These flies used to work on reservoir rainbows when I lived in England in the early to mid nineties and they certainly work on wild trout. Ask locally for best patterns, as every water has its preferred flies for these conditions.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Does rough water put fish down

I've never found that rough weather puts fish down. It might make it more tricky to catch using your preferred method. As Jimmy says, if you have become a bit of a one method man, and that method is twiddling buzzers, then you are probably not going to like a big blow. But if, on seeing a big blow, you simply put up a team of trads with a bushy muddler on the bob and go out and have a good old pull, then you are not going to be worried about it. Quite often, the rougher it is, the more the fish are up for a play. However, I think there is a bit of a species correlation to it. Salmon and sea trout lochs often fish best in a big blow, and brownie lochs often fish better in a big blow than rainbow waters. But that's not to say you can't do well on rainbow waters in a big blow, if you use suitable tactics.

Col
 

bobnudd

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I know the Trout on the big Irish lough like a big wave its good sport if a bit hairy at times. Not sure if the rainbows like it to much you don't get chance to find out if the wind gets up they stop the boats. Which is probably a good thing. In a big wave I'll always have a weighted fly on the point and then a big wet fly green peter or ivicta or some thing like that in the middle. Then something really big on the bob a bumble or something like that. Really work that bob fly the weighted fly on the point anchors every thing and helps. Then be ready for some explosive takes
 

richfish1

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Muddlers.... they come into their own in a big chop, try a size bigger than you would normally use too. Muddled Kate's, Bibio, Zulu etc. And as Jimmy says, Pull them through those waves and get ready to get your arm pulled.

Respect to all Fly Fishers....
 

Wee Jimmy

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I'm sure I've read that the downwind shore is where fish will naturally feed therefore the place to be?
Thanks Al

Downwind shore does tend to be a good shout for obvious reasons,particularly if it has been blowing in a constant direction for several days or more.Its not the only holding water though and I’d still expect to encounter fish anywhere on the five to ten foot contours.Drop offs,broken rocky ground(particularly for browns) wind lanes and foam lines are always worth investigating further upwind.
 

bobnudd

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I'm sure I've read that the downwind shore is where fish will naturally feed therefore the place to be?
Thanks Al

The only thing with down the wind shore is your boat's on the bank before you know it. On the big waters its like the sea and the waves near the sure can swamp the boat. Trust me I know
 

Cap'n Fishy

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I'm sure I've read that the downwind shore is where fish will naturally feed therefore the place to be?
Thanks Al

It certainly can be, though it tends to create its own problems. If you are drifting onto the downwind shore in a big blow, it might be you have about 2 casts in the productive zone between being too far out and being in danger of running aground. And then, if you hook a fish on one of those two casts, you have the job of landing it before you get run aground. Been plenty times I've had to hold the rod with fish in one hand, and start the motor with the other, and then 'walk the dog' to take the fish a safe distance offshore before playing it out.

A more comfortable situation is to get a wind blowing diagonally onto a shore, allowing you to zig-zag the boat in towards shore, taking wee blips on the motor to take you out every time you are coming close to shore...

Recent example - north-west shore with a south wind - 3 runs at it, over 5 hours fishing time...

GPS-Saturday.jpg

Col
 

richfish1

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It certainly can be, though it tends to create its own problems. If you are drifting onto the downwind shore in a big blow, it might be you have about 2 casts in the productive zone between being too far out and being in danger of running aground. And then, if you hook a fish on one of those two casts, you have the job of landing it before you get run aground. Been plenty times I've had to hold the rod with fish in one hand, and start the motor with the other, and then 'walk the dog' to take the fish a safe distance offshore before playing it out.

A more comfortable situation is to get a wind blowing diagonally onto a shore, allowing you to zig-zag the boat in towards shore, taking wee blips on the motor to take you out every time you are coming close to shore...

Recent example - north-west shore with a south wind - 3 runs at it, over 5 hours fishing time...

GPS-Saturday.jpg

Col
Hi Col, what app is it that you use for tracking your movements? And is it available for android do you know?

Respect to all Fly Fishers....
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Hi Col, what app is it that you use for tracking your movements? And is it available for android do you know?

Respect to all Fly Fishers....

That trace is from my camera, Rich. However, I have an App on my Android phone that does the exact same thing. It is GPX Logger. Other similar Apps are available - just search Google Play. I tend to use the one on my camera, simply because it is dead easy to download the trace along with the photos at the end of the day - plus having the GPS switched on gives the location of every photo...

Fish-1.jpg

GPX Logger creates .GPX file formats (not surprisingly!). My camera creates .LOG files. Either way, to overlay in Google Earth requires conversion to KML file format. Enter one of the most useful sites I have found in many a long time...

GPS Visualizer

Upload your data file to it, convert to KML, and when you click on it, it opens Google Earth and zooms in from somewhere in outer space, to your exact location. It's awesome to watch!

You can also use it as a GPX file with OS maps (if you subscribe to OS), which will overlay your trace on an OS map... which is also cool...

OS.jpg

Col
 

Fly Guy

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Here up in our NW corner the blowier the better. A good steady blow is what is needed. The scuddy winds don't work as good and tend to put the fish down. What we call a salmon wave works well for the brownies, sea trout and salmon. As you retrieve towards the boat, surf the team of flies on the crest of the wave for some explosive takes or just as your about to lift off.
Fishing the down wind shore works well for salmon as they lie in the shallower water as the waves crash onto the shore as more oxygen. You need someone on the oars though to keep the boat at the right distance and angle. Caught a few salmon in about 2 foot of water like this when conditions are right.
Fishing the soap as mentioned before is also good in a good wave.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Up here when we fish the white scum or tram lines its known as fishing the soap:thumbs:

Ha-ha - I've never heard that term before, but I know exactly what you mean! We were doing it up your neck of the woods just a couple of weeks ago. :thumbs:

Col
 
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