Taking pictures and then returning fish

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I dont know about others,but as I have got older(more grumpy lol)I do find it annoying seeing fish being hauled from the water and then man handled,as they dont just lie still while fighting for life out of its enviroment,just so an angler can then take a picture and then return it. No matter what people say, they are still damaged and death often occurs later as larger fish sink to the bottom. If you have killed it then I dont see a problem,but not on CandR.

I read on another post about pheasant shoots,is it right that pheasants are raised in a pen,then released for shooters to pop off tame birds?Not my cup of tea and each to their own.I suppose the same could be applied to fish and fisheries,but most being returned and if done correctly ,no problem.But some of the handling methods are disgusting to say the least.

Taken and eaten is fine but certainly it does raise my hackles when I see and hear of fish caught and dumped in dustbins.Why kill them when we have people who would be thankful for them as they cant get food and many use foodbanks?Yet we waste good food.

In my younger days my view was different, but as you get older views do change and you appreciate these things alot more. Maybe its correct of the saying the older you get the wiser you get.
 

Banksie

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It’s something I’ve often thought about myself. Especially in the match fishing community, where a whole netful is put on the bank for weighing and then photography. I can understand it if there is an exceptional fish, but other than that it’s just a bunch of fish that everyone’s seen before. In other words, boring. Just my thoughts.

ps- especially on tv, when the angler/host is holding and crooning over a fish for what seems an age. all I’m thinking is, put the bloody fish back! Oh well.
 

4wings

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I was once asked to fish for tench in a small lake. I queried the empty 45 gallon drums dotted about and was told, "you put your catch straight in there". Why? "it is going to be a carp only lake."
No thanks.
 

mrnotherone

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I think you'll get a lot of different views. Anglers range from those obsessed with fish welfare, through the ignorant and to those who clearly couldn't care less. Personally, I only fish for wild fish returning them all with minimal handling. I've learned that it is a pointless argument with those with different views.

It's a fact that some fish are more hardy than others and trout and grayling are definitely more susceptible to being out of the water, especially if played hard.
 
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I think you'll get a lot of different views. Anglers range from those obsessed with fish welfare, through the ignorant and to those who clearly couldn't care less. Personally, I only fish for wild fish returning them all with minimal handling. I've learned that it is a pointless argument with those with different views.

It's a fact that some fish are more hardy than others and trout and grayling are definitely more susceptible to being out of the water, especially if played hard.
I agree and accept we all have a different view which I do respect. I just feel that we should respect the fish and its welfare as we are supposed to be responsible anglers and caretakers of the water and what is contained within.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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I agree and accept we all have a different view which I do respect. I just feel that we should respect the fish and its welfare as we are supposed to be responsible anglers and caretakers of the water and what is contained within.
Just my tuppenceworth...

If you accept and respect people having different views to yourself, then should you be dictating to them not to take photos of fish? If we really want to respect the welfare of the fish, then surely we should all sell our fishing tackle and buy a set of golf clubs? Sticking hooks in them and pulling them out the water is not in their best interests. Given the choice between having your photo took and the latter, I reckon the fish would prefer the photo. :whistle:

Yes, I take a quick photo of a few of the better quality fish before they are returned - many by just pointing the camera into the net without even touching the fish...




Others, just getting my boat partner to lift his fish up for a second between net and water, before returning it...



If I thought these fish would live if I didn't but die because I do it, then I wouldn't do it.

I also take photos of the fish being played by my boat partner...



There is no interference at all with those ones.

If your two main hobbies are fishing and photography it's kind of inevitable that you end up taking a few photos of fish. I just never keep fish these days. Sometimes my boat partner will be on a catch & kill ticket and will catch a nice fish that he is going to keep. That gives me a chance to take a photo without worrying about time. However, I will take the photo while it is still alive. If you photograph a dead fish, it has the 'dead-eye look' and is then vulnerable to comments from the 'Catch & Releastas' who will say: "Nice fish, but why did you kill it?"

But I respect that others have a different view.

What I don't like to see is the rank bad handling of fish - where hooks have just been ripped out, tearing off the maxilla. Others where the maxilla has been pushed inside the mouth. Those are the idiots who have no respect for the fish.

Col
 
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Quote
I dont know about others,but as I have got older(more grumpy lol)I do find it annoying seeing fish being hauled from the water and then man handled,as they dont just lie still while fighting for life out of its enviroment,just so an angler can then take a picture and then return it. Unquote

Just my tuppenceworth...

What I don't like to see is the rank bad handling of fish - where hooks have just been ripped out, tearing off the maxilla. Others where the maxilla has been pushed inside the mouth. Those are the idiots who have no respect for the fish.

Col
I think we are on the same page Col.
 
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How about this one...

To be fair ,they were a food source in those days,even 20 years ago people took fish to eat,nowadays we mostly have CandR as many dont wish to take them home and clean them,another sign of the new world maybe,But the stocking of waters isnt slower as anglers demand catching in numbers and bigger fish.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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they dont just lie still while fighting for life out of its enviroment,just so an angler can then take a picture and then return it.
Here's an anecdote along those lines... a case of putting the fish before the photograph...

I was doing a piece for T&S mag with Stan Headley. Stan didn't want to bother with Loch Naver, but the hotel insisted that we have a day on Naver as part of the deal they were giving us. Nothing had been coming off it. However, we had decent conditions, and we managed a sea trout apiece. Result! I had a go with the dap, just so Stan could write that I had a go with the dap. 😜 Well, out of nowhere, a grilse took my artificial daddy. It was one of those ones where it doesn't seem to know it's been hooked and it just comes straight in. We spotted the chance to get it in quick and the boatman had the net out in a flash and I steered it in. What a bonus! A grilse on the dap! If ever we needed a good photo for the magazine, this was it. However, I could see what was coming - this fish is going to wake up and smell the coffee any second now. I took a quick snap of it just to get something in the camera before the boatman tried to lift it up for a better shot...



Well, that was the only shot I got, because the next second it woke up. It was safely in the net, which the boatman lifted up so it wasn't banging about on the deck. All three of us agreed that the only thing to do was get it back in the water before it hurt itself. There was no chance of holding it still for a shot anyway. The fly had come out in the net, so we didn't even need to handle it to unhook it. The boatman quickly tipped the net over the side and the fish shot away.
 

BobP

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A chap I was with last Friday wanted a photo of a particularly nice brown but didn't want it killed. I kept it in the net in the water while he got his camera ready, placed net on the ground and put his reel alongside. He took the photo and i returned the trout in the net into the water where it rapidly recovered and swam off when it was ready. No harm, no foul.

If they want the classic "hero" shot then the fish is killed first and they can have all the photos they want.

I do hope morayfisher doesn't eat chicken. Pheasants on a shoot live wild for about 4 months before the season starts and then they have around a 50% chance of survival. Contrast that with a truck load of chickens arriving at the processing plant. 100% are dead within 2 hours.
 
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taffy1

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Well within my comfort zone
There was a fishery just north of Swansea, The Lower Lliw Reservoir, it had a policy that every perch caught (as a by-product), any method permissable, then that perch had to be permanently removed &/or killed. I never saw the sense in that, especially as it was mainly a rainbow fishery & had some decent sized rainbows. Fry-time on perch, to me, would have benefitted the 'bows. I'm not sure now whether this fishery is still operating.
 

JohnH

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Having started my fishing life as a coarse fisher and still doing a bit, I am surprised no-one has yet said "horses for courses".

First, all fish should be treated with respect, we've had our fun catching it and on wild or semi-stocked fisheries there's the future to think of. If you want to kill a fish then get on with it. If returning fish - carp and tench are in my experience as tough as old boots. Although it does upset me to see parrot-mouthed carp, no doubt caused by the abrasive effect of braided hooklengths. Other members of the carp family, like chub, roach and dace, a little less so but still reasonably robust. Pike and perch are perhaps the least resilient coarse fish..."pike thrive on neglect". Grayling are a good deal less robust than trout but both are probably on a par with perch; above all get them back in the water quickly. I sometimes wonder if a slight recent decline seen in grayling fishing on popular chalkstream beats is due to winter fishing pressure, and particularly well-meaning bait fishers nevertheless applying fish care standards appropriate to chub and dace to a far less robust species.
 

thetrouttickler

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The trout lakes I used to fish as a child had a policy that all smallmouth bass and bream had to be killed. As was the fashion in those days I was instructed to simply throw them up the bank to die. Bass were commonly caught, but in the cold water they hardly grew to any great size. Bream would grow to a decent size but would never take a fly. Until one day, when one did. First and only bream. It was a good size so I put it in a plastic carrier bag to take home for our gardener (this was Swaziland) destined to be turned into a stew. An hour later when we got home, I opened the car boot and the fish was still alive. Talk about some fish being hardier than others...

We had a great big outdoor laundry basin (about 1mx1m) so I filled it up to the brim and put the fish in it. There was an outdoor light above the basin which attracted insects at night (it never wanted for food). That fish lived in the basin for over a year, as our "pet" until we released it into a local irrigation canal. The things we did as children (I wouldn't do either thing today of course, but I guess the fish never became stew).

Not especially on topic, but addressing the point that some fish are hardier than others. I think trout are a little hardier than some might give them credit for, but it's not an excuse to be irresponsible. There is almost something of a "cancel culture" developing around this issue and I guess we just need to be responsible and balanced about it. Does it mean simply no photos? No. Does it mean we should handle the fish responsibly and as little as possible? Yes.
 
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4wings

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I saw a beach angler with a mat laid out and a phone or small camera set up on a bank stick, ready to go should he catch something worth while
 

Maruta

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I fish alone so don't get many "hero shots". I do my best to keep em wet and always rest them in the net until they swim off strong.
 

anzac

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but wasn't C&R started in America in the 1970s as a conservation means to preserve wild fish stocks? Then, as angling became more of a sport and less about sustenance it became common at stocked fisheries.

As I mentioned elsewhere, my granddad and dad (sustenance fishermen both) taught me to fish. They taught me not to waste fish. We ate what we caught, and any undersize or unwanted 'rubbish fish' not fit for the table went straight back in the water. The only time in those day (1950s & 60s) that we saw anglers taking photos, it was deep sea sports fisherman on holiday with Marlin, sharks, or the likes hanging by the tail.

With this in mind, I have to wonder if we have a collision of three modern trends. First, we have a move from sustenance to sport fishing. Incumbent with that we moved more and more towards C&R as standard practice. Finally, we have a growing awareness of the ecosystem and appreciation of each species. Has this, I wonder led to more anglers wanting a tangible connection to the memory of the catch that has led to happy snaps with many anglers not really knowing how to handle fish properly and safely.
 
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