Taking pictures and then returning fish

wobbly face

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Okay, most of those ugly mug shots (me included though didn't plan any) will have been taken by a second person. Camera (or whatever) at the ready, big cheesy grin and click, fish back in the water. Nice and quick hopefully. I don't like trout left in landing nets whilst people setup camera or whatever, trout are not suppose to be kept in keep nets, being left in a landing net is just the same if not worse.
I suppose if we all had a super duper conscience we would be using no hook flies and counting how many offers we get. No fish for supper.
 

BobP

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Does every pheasant shot get eaten or bulldozed into a hole at a huge cost?Months after being freed?Chickens are bred purely for food and eaten and also for their eggs used for many things.
But you knew that.Its just my view, Im not out change anyones elses view.I just believe if you kill something eat it,dont ditch it in a bin which is just killing for killings sake and a bit of fun.As I explained in my OP.Killing fish and dumping them in a dustbin is a total waste and does nothing for fishing
Somebody else who believes that urban myth about pheasants being buried. If that were the case why would every shoot in my part of the country go to the bother of installing a chiller to which shot game is taken as soon as is reasonably practicable in order to comply with food hygiene standards. Why do we see a chiller van driving around the country lanes with H*******e Game written all over going to various shoots to collect the game for processing into the food market? Why go to all that bother if you are just going to shove the birds into a hole, which by the way is illegal.

The average pheasant these days weighs about 5lbs. 6lbs for a cock and 4lbs for a hen, so 5lbs average is reasonable. 250 is a fairly normal day so that equates to 1250 lbs. The shoot does 30 days which is fairly modest by many standards so that racks up 37500 lbs or 15 tons give or take. THAT requires a considerable hole and is not the sort of thing that is going to go unnoticed - and nobody yet has noticed.

I've heard this ridiculous allegation time and time again, but nobody has yet produced categorical proof. Plenty of "I heard from a mate that his mate told him he had met someone in the pub whose best friend said he had heard it from his wife's sister in law." Lots of good solid evidence like that but has anyone seen it, photographed it, and if so why wasn't it slapped all over Facebook or whatever in about 30 seconds flat?
 
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Somebody else who believes that urban myth about pheasants being buried. If that were the case why would every shoot in my part of the country go to the bother of installing a chiller to which shot game is taken as soon as is reasonably practicable in order to comply with food hygiene standards. Why do we see a chiller van driving around the country lanes with H*******e Game written all over going to various shoots to collect the game for processing into the food market? Why go to all that bother if you are just going to shove the birds into a hole, which by the way is illegal.

The average pheasant these days weighs about 5lbs. 6lbs for a cock and 4lbs for a hen, so 5lbs average is reasonable. 250 is a fairly normal day so that equates to 1250 lbs. The shoot does 30 days which is fairly modest by many standards so that racks up 37500 lbs or 15 tons give or take. THAT requires a considerable hole and is not the sort of thing that is going to go unnoticed - and nobody yet has noticed.

I've heard this ridiculous allegation time and time again, but nobody has yet produced categorical proof. Plenty of "I heard from a mate that his mate told him he had met someone in the pub whose best friend said he had heard it from his wife's sister in law." Lots of good solid evidence like that but has anyone seen it, photographed it, and if so why wasn't it slapped all over Facebook or whatever in about 30 seconds flat?


Just a couple.Now dont get the feeling Im a member of Peta,far from it but I have explained my reasons.We have responsible and we also ,sadly ,have irresponsible.Bit like the Hen harriers and eagles being shot to protect grouse moors.I know many keepers and its their jobs and they do it responsibly as far as I am aware.All Im saying is if its killed eat it ,dont ditch it in a bin after you have had your fun.
 

anzac

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I find ridiculous that anyone would believe that the end result of a pheasant hunt is the birds being turfed over in some mass grave.

My grandad took me out with him when he hunted pheasants on his farm. Always, any bird taken ended up on the dinner table.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Somebody else who believes that urban myth about pheasants being buried. If that were the case why would every shoot in my part of the country go to the bother of installing a chiller to which shot game is taken as soon as is reasonably practicable in order to comply with food hygiene standards. Why do we see a chiller van driving around the country lanes with H*******e Game written all over going to various shoots to collect the game for processing into the food market? Why go to all that bother if you are just going to shove the birds into a hole, which by the way is illegal.

The average pheasant these days weighs about 5lbs. 6lbs for a cock and 4lbs for a hen, so 5lbs average is reasonable. 250 is a fairly normal day so that equates to 1250 lbs. The shoot does 30 days which is fairly modest by many standards so that racks up 37500 lbs or 15 tons give or take. THAT requires a considerable hole and is not the sort of thing that is going to go unnoticed - and nobody yet has noticed.

I've heard this ridiculous allegation time and time again, but nobody has yet produced categorical proof. Plenty of "I heard from a mate that his mate told him he had met someone in the pub whose best friend said he had heard it from his wife's sister in law." Lots of good solid evidence like that but has anyone seen it, photographed it, and if so why wasn't it slapped all over Facebook or whatever in about 30 seconds flat?
You assume that whatever happens on your local patch must be unerringly reproduced throughout the rest of the British Isles?
 

PaulD

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It's neither an urban myth nor is it as common place as some would suggest. I know of shoots ( corporate days etc, ) where many of the participants do not take a brace at the end of the day (I suspect they don't know what to do with them!) and similarly shoots where the keepers are unable to give away birds. In any perspective it is a terrible, and in many ways, an unforgivable waste when a quality food product is trashed. However, when you consider the amount of food that is wasted by supermarket chains and the fact that food banks could not deal with a cart load of dead pheasants, one wonders what the positive options might be.
 

anzac

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Just a couple.Now dont get the feeling Im a member of Peta,far from it but I have explained my reasons.We have responsible and we also ,sadly ,have irresponsible.Bit like the Hen harriers and eagles being shot to protect grouse moors.I know many keepers and its their jobs and they do it responsibly as far as I am aware.All Im saying is if its killed eat it ,dont ditch it in a bin after you have had your fun.
Regarding these photos and articles, yes they are shocking. Two things though. Firstly, both articles are based upon supposition. The latte admits this when it states that the person who discovered the roadside dump believed that may they possibly have come from a local shoot. Secondly, the photos in the first article are credited to an organisation whose agenda is to end hunting. Are the articles credible? Is either or both instances the result of unethical hunters or some other actor, unknown persons fly tipping dead diseased birds possibly.

What I am saying is that no ethical hunter, gamekeeper, or landowner would dispose of game birds that way. Birds 'surplus to needs' can and would be cleaned and frozen for future consumption just as your supermarket chicken is.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Anyhoo... here is a photograph of a fish that was returned...



It 'swam away strongly'... as they like to say... 😜
 
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Regarding these photos and articles, yes they are shocking. Two things though. Firstly, both articles are based upon supposition. The latte admits this when it states that the person who discovered the roadside dump believed that may they possibly have come from a local shoot. Secondly, the photos in the first article are credited to an organisation whose agenda is to end hunting. Are the articles credible? Is either or both instances the result of unethical hunters or some other actor, unknown persons fly tipping dead diseased birds possibly.

What I am saying is that no ethical hunter, gamekeeper, or landowner would dispose of game birds that way. Birds 'surplus to needs' can and would be cleaned and frozen for future consumption just as your supermarket chicken is.

 

tangled

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I've fished C&K places where the litter bins are full of fish and fish are chucked into the hedgerows.
 

anzac

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I've fished C&K places where the litter bins are full of fish and fish are chucked into the hedgerows.
Again, that is not the actions of ethical anglers.

That's been my point from the beginning of this discussion. Abuse of the fish or game is not the sport's fault. The guilt for it lies with those who from selfishness, laziness, or ignorance choose to act in an unethical manner.
 
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Again, that is not the actions of ethical anglers.

That's been my point from the beginning of this discussion. Abuse of the fish or game is not the sport's fault. The guilt for it lies with those who from selfishness, laziness, or ignorance choose to act in an unethical manner.
That being the point of the OP.But It reflects on responsible anglers aswell.
 

anzac

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The Yanks have game wardens who actually have police powers. Poaching, taking undersize fish or game, taking more than the allowed quota, and even mismanagement of edible game or fish are punishable offenders. They take abuses of hunting and fishing laws and privileges very seriously with fines, loss of licences and even imprisonment.

The question then is what can we as anglers, fishery managers, ghillies, gatekeepers, etc., and the government do to control and prevent unethical treatment and abuse of fish and game while preserving our sports for us and future generations?
 

Wee Jimmy

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There's a big brownie in the Black Loch that has been caught and held for a photograph umpteen times. Its photo is on the wall of the hut, with numerous captors. And as far as I know it is still going strong.
Col
Is that the one with the all over suntan....😃
 

aenoon

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You assume that whatever happens on your local patch must be unerringly reproduced throughout the rest of the British Isles?
Col, you regularly attend a syndicate shoot, what happens to the dead game there?
I have Shot, picked up, and beated at shoots the length and breadth of Scotland.
The "big shoots" hang the birds straight after day ends, the medium ones do same, ready for delivery/collection by game dealers, the smaller ones disperse bag amongst the participants.
I have never seen, 50 years of participating, any of the end result buried, or indeed left to rot.
I would be the first to complain if so.
regards
Bert
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Col, you regularly attend a syndicate shoot, what happens to the dead game there?
I have Shot, picked up, and beated at shoots the length and breadth of Scotland.
The "big shoots" hang the birds straight after day ends, the medium ones do same, ready for delivery/collection by game dealers, the smaller ones disperse bag amongst the participants.
I have never seen, 50 years of participating, any of the end result buried, or indeed left to rot.
I would be the first to complain if so.
regards
Bert
Doesn't matter what the fate is of the birds shot by the guys I go out with. I would not make the mistake of assuming that because they did one thing, it must therefore apply to the whole of the British Isles.
 

speytime

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When I was in my 20/30s I attended shoots over Dumfries and the Borders I never seen any birds going to waste, the beaters would take a good share at £2 a brace iirc and the rest went to a game dealers in Galashiels.

Al
 

aenoon

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Best practice might be universal. Just because it is practiced on your local shoot is no guarantee that it is practiced everywhere, though, surely?
Perhaps, but with most shoots it does seem to be the way, and by the way, I am referring to more than just my "local shoot".
I pick up and trial dogs all over the country.
regards
Bert
 
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