Teeny tiny nymphs on rivers

young jon

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I often fish a #18 PTN in the summer months and grease the leader up to use for an indicator, or barrel knot some dayglo braided backing on and grease that up as well. It’s a great method when the fish aren’t rising.
 

whalebone

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I've tried this a few times on the stream, a tiny copper head flashback behind a larger copperhead cased caddis but the fish always take the caddis.
But when I fish that same tiny pattern under a dry duo style the trout and grayling on some days just can't get enough of it.

Chris.
 

iainmortimer

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#18 is my go to size of nymph on some of the tiny headwaters I fish which with a small copper bead catch me plenty when fished solo so don't think they have to be attached to something big! Its a shame the article didn't talk about that for bite detection is no difference to a larger nymph in that your simply waiting for the line to stop, change direction or disappear!
 

mot

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I've used tiny shrimp patterns on the Dove in combination with a large jig to get them down in high flows and picked up some quality grayling on them. Surprising what the fish will see and take even in quite fast water near the deck
 

pedros

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#18 is my go to size of nymph on some of the tiny headwaters I fish which with a small copper bead catch me plenty when fished solo so don't think they have to be attached to something big! Its a shame the article didn't talk about that for bite detection is no difference to a larger nymph in that your simply waiting for the line to stop, change direction or disappear!

I'll fish 18's singly too when flow/depth enable me to do so (summer). I'd suggest the author is focusing more on getting your tiny nymphs to the bottom quickly in deeper water and/or stronger flows.
As for attaching the tiny nymph I suppose Davy knotting or similar 10" of line above the big'un and sliding down to the eye offers more flexibility that tying to the bend...
 

Bongoch

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Tying a light weight nymph on a short dropper off the bend of a heavier nymph is pretty common in NZ, very successful technique when fishing drop-offs. Stu Tripney has a great wee fly called the Pogo nymph (Pogo - WA 004 » Stu's Fly Shop - Superior Flies in Athol, New Zealand) which works well in that scenario. It has a foam head so that while the heavier fly is bouncing along the bottom the Pogo drifts just above it. The Pogo accounted for some cracking fish in NZ last year! :thumbs:
 

mhv

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With what kind of knot can you attach a trailer line in the hook bend of another fly?

Martin.
 

Bongoch

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With what kind of knot can you attach a trailer line in the hook bend of another fly?

Martin.

I use a double davey knot personally. The principle is the same as the duo only the first fly is a weighted nymph not a dry.
 

vital

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My fishing buddy and I are volunteers who monitor river invertebrate life for the RMI and the ARMI on The River Meon at two sites every month of the year, now moving into our third year. You would be astonished to see just how small the natural bugs are on average. There are a minority of mature nymphs and Gammarus but more than 50% os each species we find regularly are immature and tiny! So, for Olives, BWOs, and Stone clingers the commonest sizes that we find equate to #18 and smaller, next the Gammarus (shrimp) are #16 and smaller (but are the most plentiful species). Cased caddis and caseless caddis have a wider distribution of sizes so I would not presume to proffer an average. We don't get a lot of true May fly nymphs so again I will not suggest an average despite there being quite a wide range of sizes from an inch-and-a-quarter downwards.
That said, if a fish is feeding selectively small sizes may be very important, if it is feeding opportunely it would probably go for the larger sizes of prey which require less effort to maximise the nutrition achieved by feeding.
 

Bongoch

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My fishing buddy and I are volunteers who monitor river invertebrate life for the RMI and the ARMI on The River Meon at two sites every month of the year, now moving into our third year. You would be astonished to see just how small the natural bugs are on average. There are a minority of mature nymphs and Gammarus but more than 50% os each species we find regularly are immature and tiny! So, for Olives, BWOs, and Stone clingers the commonest sizes that we find equate to #18 and smaller, next the Gammarus (shrimp) are #16 and smaller (but are the most plentiful species). Cased caddis and caseless caddis have a wider distribution of sizes so I would not presume to proffer an average. We don't get a lot of true May fly nymphs so again I will not suggest an average despite there being quite a wide range of sizes from an inch-and-a-quarter downwards.
That said, if a fish is feeding selectively small sizes may be very important, if it is feeding opportunely it would probably go for the larger sizes of prey which require less effort to maximise the nutrition achieved by feeding.

Completely agree, I'm part of the riverfly monitoring team for my club and it's a real eye opener. The cased and caseless caddis can be quite big but our shrimp and nymphs of upwing flies are, for the most part, tiny.
 

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