The answer to the floods?

Reg Wyatt

Well-known member
Points
28
I was watching question time on BBC last night and during a discussion about flooding etc somebody in the audience said, "Just dredge the rivers like we used to do. That will immediately solve all the flooding problems. Dredge the rivers." The environment minister was on the panel but other than applause there was no other comments or denial of the ridiculous thought.
How in this day and age does the question of dredging rivers as a solution still come up. Why has it not been properly explained? The UK general public seems so completely uninformed about causes and limited solutions available reference flooding and the general movement of water.
I'm not necessarily looking to blame anybody but rather question why there is not more of an education drive about our at times rather wet country. In the meantime my thoughts go to people suffering the tragedy of flooding.

Reg Wyatt
 

Open loop

Member
Points
3
Because the government doesn't want to explain there is no cost effective answer to the question of flood plains flooding so they're going to do nothing to solve the problem long term. What they will do however is let the people demand dredging and then do a limited amount of dredging as it's not massively expensive, compared to building flood defences, and thus give the impression the government is listening to the people and doing it's best for the people and they can keep trotting out the 'once in a hundred year event' line.
 
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rabmax

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
Ayrshire
You see it everytime there is flooding.There was some so called expert on the news 10 minutes ago.He was saying they should dredge rivers to make them smooth.Also cut all the trees down along the river bankings.Where do they get these plonkers from.
 

wobbly face

Well-known member
Points
63
Location
Not So Greater Manchester.
You see it everytime there is flooding.There was some so called expert on the news 10 minutes ago.He was saying they should dredge rivers to make them smooth.Also cut all the trees down along the river bankings.Where do they get these plonkers from.
I bet they're getting paid good money for the miss-information.
 

jeffhirst

Well-known member
Points
18
I feel for the people affected...there is no easy solution however much money you chuck at it. ...these things happen and you cannot control nature especially in flood plains and river valleys. King Canute comes to mind.
 

Juneau

Well-known member
Points
18
The problem is that the great British public out there, some of whom have had the river running through their living rooms three times this year will see dredging as the answer. Try telling someone with mud stains half way up their walls that dredging will make things worse, not better.

Thus far there does not seem to have been a coordinated response or plan from the EA and Government on the way to manage our rivers in a sensible manner to minimise the sort of floods we have recently seen.

Looking at the flood barriers that are being erected I am reminded of a John Wyndham book from the 1960's, "The Kraken Wakes." Earth is invaded by extra-terrestrials who take up residence in the deepest parts of the oceans and eventually start to melt the ice caps. As the water levels rise one of the scientists looking from a bridge in London at the walls of sandbags built onto top of the Chelsea embankment asks the question, "I wonder how high they will go before the futility of it strikes home?". The walls break and London is flooded. He further comments that someone up among the ghosts of time is having a good laugh at it all and when questioned as to who that might be replies, "King Canute"
 

shropshire_lad

Well-known member
Complex situation with complex answers, most of which I have seen covered on this Forum in other threads.

However, a personal thought. For millennia humans appear to have better understood nature as their day-to-day survival depended on that understanding. They presumably accepted its unpredictability and natural variations. Now we seem to think we can conquer it, sort out every problem, manage out every risk, etc. Of course, we can't.
 
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Secret Angler

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
London
We should simple pass a law against the Met Office. That would solve the problem, and it would fit in nicely with current Govt policy.
 

diawl bach

Well-known member
Points
83
I went to a public meeting held by EAW after a massive flood at Llechryd some years ago. Full of people who had bought houses in the full knowledge that they flooded demanding dredging, flood defences and loadsa money generally. Brave as I am I kept my counsel rather than being lynched.
 

shropshire_lad

Well-known member
I went to a public meeting held by EAW after a massive flood at Llechryd some years ago. Full of people who had bought houses in the full knowledge that they flooded demanding dredging, flood defences and loadsa money generally. Brave as I am I kept my counsel rather than being lynched.
Wise move I'd say. I have not bought a property for 20 years but my understanding is searches are now pretty thorough and flood mapping pretty extensive, risk averse and accurate? You can see the stuff online on the EA's website, or could.

Surface water flooding is more problematic. If people in our neighbourhood keep on felling trees and paving over their drives for their prized cars we may be in trouble :cry: Little connection with the natural environment until something goes wrong. Nature is a pest.
 

easker1

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
Highlands
the dredging doesn't always work, it was tried in Northern California it was found to make the river move faster causing bank erosion, now in CA you are not allowed to rebuild within certain distances from a river bank and certainly no builds on flood plains,yet here in the UK planning permission has just been given for thousands more houses to be built , on flood plains? there must be a clue there in the statement, some developers don,t care as long as they build houses.houses on stilts may be the answer, its hard lines on the people who do have the regular floods, easker1
 

glas y dorlan

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
mid wales
I went to a public meeting held by EAW after a massive flood at Llechryd some years ago. Full of people who had bought houses in the full knowledge that they flooded demanding dredging, flood defences and loadsa money generally. Brave as I am I kept my counsel rather than being lynched.
Twice in twelve months that lower end of Llechryd has been flooded now. I reckon the bridge is now more of a hindrance than a help due to its age but would hate to see it replaced. Difficult.
 

diawl bach

Well-known member
Points
83
Rebuilding the parapet on that bridge - a scheduled ancient monument - is a Herculean task, every winter it's submerged and a tree bounces into it. Pont Seli in Abercych's similarly afflicted but it's drivers who've had one over the eight who go through it!

I was reading that 1 in ten houses built since 2013 are built in flood risk situations, why remedial work - where possible - is funded by the public purse is beyond me.

 

glas y dorlan

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
mid wales
Rebuilding the parapet on that bridge - a scheduled ancient monument - is a Herculean task, every winter it's submerged and a tree bounces into it. Pont Seli in Abercych's similarly afflicted but it's drivers who've had one over the eight who go through it!

I was reading that 1 in ten houses built since 2013 are built in flood risk situations, why remedial work - where possible - is funded by the public purse is beyond me.

I would bite the bullet and demolish the bridge sorry. A modern bridge with one support would ensure a quicker continual flow. Very controversial I know. Nag’s Head plus the now defunct Fox and Hounds - happy days.
 

diawl bach

Well-known member
Points
83
I would bite the bullet and demolish the bridge sorry. A modern bridge with one support would ensure a quicker continual flow. Very controversial I know. Nag’s Head plus the now defunct Fox and Hounds - happy days.
If they copied the elegant and robust Cenarth bridge as a template for a replacement at Llechryd it would have the height and the channel to accommodate the now-normal superfloods, I'd be happy enough with that alright, Cadw might have something to say though.
 

Paul_B

Well-known member
Points
63
Location
South Yorkshire
They dredged our local river and straightened it out, the stuff they removed from the river made an excellent flood bank to stop the floodplain flooding, all in all it helped a couple of houses in our village for several years.
Those downstream didn't fair too well as the impact of the full force of the river has took its toll on major towns and villages for many years since.

Plan B,
How to stop thousand's of houses from flooding downstream
 

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