The best trout river in the UK

BrownieBasher

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I still cannot see any difference at all between a stocked rainbow or a stocked brownie. They're all triploid so it's just a difference in colour to me. If there has to be a stocking I think sensible size and quality of fish is the most important thing. Thinking that stock browns are somehow more natural than stock rainbows is a cop out to me. Like you say sewinbasher, different views I guess.

Reg Wyatt
I think there IS a difference between a stocked rainbow and a stocked brown. Browns are the indigenous species and so supplementing the naturals with stockies is acceptable IMO and when done sympathetically. Rainbows are a faster growing, more aggressive species introduced to this country to satisfy the boom in people wanting to catch trout. they're also more nomadic than the territorial brown and so are likely to disappear into other stretches nearby. We dont want to see 'spartics' 'blues' and 'goldies' in our chalkstreams do we.? lets stick with indigenous fish (preferably from the broodstock in the river)
 

Reg Wyatt

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Look.
In your post you said I was "completely wrong" I was just agreeing with JohnH's earlier post and giving some further information prompted by his "is less suited to recruitment of wildies" comment. Which it is. So go argue with him too.
Also you comment twice about sewinbasher's purely personal opinions. .
Now you come back to me again. Who cares whether the 21 was at Testwood or the nearby Nursling? It's just an example of how the salmon numbers on the Test have declined since then

So goodbye to you on this.

Ha ha calm down flyfisher. You come on here like a know it all and just can't bear to admit you're wrong. Nothing to be ashamed about but if you stick your head above the parapet as you frequently do and wind pretty much everybody up, then expect to be shot down now and again when you get things confused.
It's a fishing forum, have some humility for goodness sake.

Reg Wyatt
 

mike fox

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Yes, i have fished this stretch a few times. it's lovely water, but imo there are just a few too many stockies in there. that said, there's always one or two very tricky fish, especially just above the aquaduct there, or right at the bottom of the stretch, near Dever Springs. I came accross an escapee from Dever there last year, a brownie of about 8lb. took a dry sedge and went utterly berserk! lost him after a hell of a fight.
The hatch pool at the very top of Beat 2 where you cross over from the fishing hut holds quite a few resident wildies. They are small but great fun and a break from the easy to catch stockies. There was a huge brown in the hatch pool on Beat 1 just before the aqueduct which I have hooked but never landed because I'm always fishing too light and my tippet breaks. Is it not a 'viaduct' as opposed to an 'aqueduct'?
 

JayP

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I just looked at your link and it says "After June the 15th swim priority goes to coarse anglers". I was a little interested up until that point.

LOL what are you expecting bedchairs every 10 meters over the three mile stretch :LOL::LOL::LOL:
 

Jason 70

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LOL what are you expecting bedchairs every 10 meters over the three mile stretch :LOL::LOL::LOL:


No it's not that I had an image in my head of fishing away happily and another angler coming along and asking "Would you move please I would like to fish here and I have precedent" Many moons ago I fished a well-known stream in Berkshire for Barbel, you had other anglers asking "How long are you going to fish in this swim for?" or "You don't mind if I tackle up behind you and wait until your finished" I wish I was making this up, sadly I'm not.
 

thetrouttickler

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I see a lot of this thread became focused on the stocked chalkstreams. How about a chalkstream where no stocking takes place? I give you the River Meon. It's a natural little gem. A smaller version of the Itchen and it only has wild fish. Paul Proctor apparently rates it in his best rivers list.

Other than the Meon, I like the Usk too. My other favourite stream, also in Wales, I would prefer to keep a secret. I really enjoyed fishing it, never had a bad day there in fact, and would happily take a 2 hour train journey there to fish it. The Driffield Beck which I fished recently was a real delight too. I enjoy the "walking in the footsteps of the greats" identified earlier in this thread, too.
 

mike fox

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The Driffield Beck which I fished recently was a real delight too. I enjoy the "walking in the footsteps of the greats" identified earlier in this thread, too.
The Driffield Beck is a superb stretch especially at Mulberry Whin, which is now syndicated and they only offer a few day tickets with accommodation at the farm house. It has a good head of wildies and large Grayling. Well worth a visit.
 

PaulD

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South Northants
I don't understand this at all sewinbasher? A stocked fish is a stocked fish - what difference does the colour make? Neither stocked fish are natural so why are rainbows worse?

Reg Wyatt

The real question is, why stock, browns or rainbows? If a river is capable of sustaining a limited population of 10" browns, that's what you fish for. If you desire an improved population of fish to fish for, the sustainable option is to improve the environment for the indigenous population. Simply stocking to satisfy a 'need' to catch is ultimately self defeating.
 

thetrouttickler

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The real question is, why stock, browns or rainbows? If a river is capable of sustaining a limited population of 10" browns, that's what you fish for. If you desire an improved population of fish to fish for, the sustainable option is to improve the environment for the indigenous population. Simply stocking to satisfy a 'need' to catch is ultimately self defeating.

People won't pay £300 per day to catch skittish 10" trout.
 

Elwyman

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North Wales
I have never fished a chalkstream, but I imagine fishing to large visible trout with dry fly on a chalkstream must be at the top of the list for most anglers.
I once walked a short length of Driffield Beck and the trout looked like fat pigs.
 

Paul_B

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West Riding of Yorkshire
The real question is, why stock, browns or rainbows? If a river is capable of sustaining a limited population of 10" browns, that's what you fish for. If you desire an improved population of fish to fish for, the sustainable option is to improve the environment for the indigenous population. Simply stocking to satisfy a 'need' to catch is ultimately self defeating.

They stocked our local river with brown trout, salmon parr, grayling and eels, why because they weren't any and they were introducing them :)

and its worked very well thank you (y)
 

eddleston123

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Peebles, Scottish Borders
The real question is, why stock, browns or rainbows? If a river is capable of sustaining a limited population of 10" browns, that's what you fish for. If you desire an improved population of fish to fish for, the sustainable option is to improve the environment for the indigenous population. Simply stocking to satisfy a 'need' to catch is ultimately self defeating.


I'd rather catch a 10'' wild brownie than a 10lb stocked fish.

But, let's make this clear, that is only my opinion. I suspect that I am in the minority.

Everyone to their own!




Douglas
 

tierradelfuego

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I don’t think you’re in a minority at all Douglas. I fish mostly WBT and grayling rivers for my enjoyment but usually do have a couple of days on a big fish stocked lake each year just to fill the freezer. Sometimes I enjoy those two days, sometimes I don’t. From those two days I make 100 fish cakes for us and usually smoke a few sides. Certainly would take a few hundred WBT to do the same thing. Enjoyment vs Request from the wife...
 

taffy1

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Well within my comfort zone
I'm sure the Aberdeenshire Don is pretty high on some anglers wish list. The river Derwent could be another. The Derbyshire Wye has it's own natural breeding rainbows, again this could be on that bucket list.
 

2306chris

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Jun 10, 2013
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Cumbria
I fish a couple of North Yorkshire Streams . Wild and un stocked containing grayling to 2 lb plus and brownies to 16 inches . Season permits for the two together is £105 .

Hard to imagine anything better .

O M W
Hi O M W, sounds like heaven to me.....do they have any room for new members?
Thanks, Chris
 
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