The lost cast

Noodles

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I was looking through some old fishing photos last night and all the photos that included salmon rods all the casting was done overhead.

While overhead in strong winds (especially from behind) or when fishing heavier flies like heavy cones or brass tubes can be only described as a little dangerous, and no doubt a spey cast generally is the safer cast.

I have seen a transition over the years with the spey cast becoming more popular with modern rods and lines making it easier with short heads and fast actioned rods, less and less anglers are using an overhead cast on a double hander, a cast that I believe still has its place in certain conditions, for one a perfectly executed overhead creates less disturbance on smaller rivers and I have found it handles fishing more open rivers when fighting a wind.
 

anzac

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I don't know if this is any help, but I watched a Canadian fly fishing series filmed in British Columbia when I was visiting my son who lives amongst the Septics. Salmon fishing was a frequent feature, but mostly from a boat and off-shore. Nonetheless, almost all of their casting was side casting.
 

aenoon

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Linlithgow, Scotland and anywhere i can wet a line
The overhead cast, when executed with the lift,the back cast, and out again, if done correctly, as you say, will always be less of a disturbance on the water, but hey, if is salmon fishing, dont really think it matters in 90% of situations.
A taking fish would take if the fly was attached directly to the line, when swimmers and boats are alongside!
regards
Bert
 

speytime

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A clean lift and a backcast is always going to be the best but once you get the hang of touch and go casting there's very little disturbance created.

Al
 

tenet

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Overheadcast is all well and good when on the river and casting downstream at say 45degrees. Not so straightforward when a square cast is required which often involves repositioning of the line prior to exercising the cast then the Spey cast or the many variations come into play.
 

ohanzee

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Overhead casting a salmon line needs enough space behind to stick a back cast, when you have a bank behind the spey can give you a longer cast.
 

easker1

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you must remember Cone heads and tubes are relatively recent, the big flies were tied on 3in Irons which must have been a pain to cast , the tubes gave you a big fly but much lighter than the big irons,before Carbon fibre and glass rods, there would be Green heart and or split Cane,I have the remains of a 16ft Aberdeen made rod of Hickory with a lance wood top, it must have been a beast to cast, I remember reading about Grant who made the Vibration rods of Greenheart up to 18 ft for the Spey with Horse hair lines and silk worm gut casts, that's when men were men, easker1
 

ohanzee

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Grant is an interesting character, he cast nearly 200 feet without shooting line.
 
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