Thread tension

webblade

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It's a bit of a fiddle. Spools of the same size interchange pretty well but some spools have a paper label, some have bare plastic sides which can need adjustment of tension. A few times, by accident. I've contrived to remove tension while using it. I think the Smhaen is a better buy.
Thanks Paul. I'll have a look at the Smhaen.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Having to was my hands a thousand times a day isn't helping them :oops:

Aye, that has been a disaster for me. Had patches of dermatitis breaking out all over the place. Got a tube of Betnovate from the doc. What is helping is avoiding contact with fruit and veg juices. So, I'm wearing surgical gloves to prepare food now. Also got a big bottle of E45 moisturising lotion in every room and using it liberally. 🤪 Hands are much better than they were a couple of months ago.
 

len1

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Anyroad, I wouldn't wind a hackle that way. I would start nearest the head, with the thread behind the hackle - at the front of the body. Wind the turns of hackle going from head to body to reach where the thread is lying. Then bring turns of thread forwards through the hackle to the head. That way, the turns of hackle are X-crossed and locked down by the thread. So, even if a fish's tooth cuts the hackle stalk, or pulls the end out, it can't unwind. (y)

Col
Interestingly that is how winding a hackle is
described in my old but much loved Veniard’s books.
Len
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Interestingly that is how winding a hackle is
described in my old but much loved Veniard’s books.
Len

I kind of assumed that most folk did it that way. Maybe that's why some folk tie 30 flies and catch one fish on each of them. If you tie it X-crossed, you can tie one fly and catch 30 fish on it... 😜

 

m r roid

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These are my favourite bobbin holders. They were a present from my friend in the Netherlands who made them. They even have miniature cork disc drags 🤣😂
Smoooooooth 👍👍
IMG_20210405_121640.jpg
 

m r roid

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Aye, that has been a disaster for me. Had patches of dermatitis breaking out all over the place. Got a tube of Betnovate from the doc. What is helping is avoiding contact with fruit and veg juices. So, I'm wearing surgical gloves to prepare food now. Also got a big bottle of E45 moisturising lotion in every room and using it liberally. 🤪 Hands are much better than they were a couple of months ago.
I have outbreaks of Psoriasis and Eczema, and find O'Keefes 'Working Hands' helps 👍😊
 

wjg

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I'm curious Cap'n. With such a long piece of thread hanging, can you spin the thread to flatten or tighten up the twist easily?
 

Cap'n Fishy

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I'm curious Cap'n. With such a long piece of thread hanging, can you spin the thread to flatten or tighten up the twist easily?

It tends to flatten whether I want it or not! Tying left-handed, I find most threads, flosses, chenilles, fritzes, and everything else that gets wound tends to unravel when wound leftie. So, I am forever twirling things anticlockwise to try and tighten them up as I go along.

Here is a video of me tying one of the flies I am currently doing a re-stock on...


Col
 
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webblade

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It tends to flatten whether I want it or not! Tying left-handed, I find most threads, flosses, chenilles, fritzes, and everything else that gets wound tends to unravel when wound leftie. So, I am forever twirling things anticlockwise to try and tighten them up as I go along.

I'm currently having a play at shooting videos. I'm needing to sort out my exposure. I tried on auto and 0EV, but I've overexposed my effort yesterday. Didn't allow for trying to use light materials against a dark background (me).

I knew it was overexposed, but I used it to practice processing it and loading it up, which all worked OK. Having done it, you guys may as well have it... 😜


Off to work at my exposure levels...

Col
You're very efficient without the bobbin Col its a joy to watch. Just curious about how you wrap the thread around your finger how does your finger stay the distance from the hook like how does it not wrap all the way to the hook? Is your finger sliding down the loop of thread?
 

wjg

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I thought you tied lefty. I think this is a major advantage when using a bobbin holder resting suspended above the desk height. Quick 2 second spin while picking up anything and I have the thread flat or twisted, ready for the next application. Do you twist the thread itself or reach down and spin the spool?
 

bluezulu49

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Hi All,

I have googled this and seen advice ranging from “as tight as possible without breaking the thread" to “just tight enough to suspend the bobbin holder”.
Also things like winding the thread around the leg of the holder before it goes through the tube or starting with minimal tension and “palm” the bobbin or squeeze the legs as you wrap to vary tension.
The above assumes a standard, two wire legged holder.
How do you control yours?
Or, is there any merit in holders with adjustable drag, if so which ones?

cheers

John
I have been using a Petitjean bobbin holder for three years now. It is much less fiddly than the Rite bobbin, adjusts the tension well, is very quick to load and I use it for all of my tying now. It weighs 10g empty and spins well. It does however have its quirks. You need to wind with the smooth side facing you and to keep the thread under tension when pushing the point away from you as otherwise it tends to unthread itself. If I were starting again this is the one I would buy even though it is pricey.
 

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ACW

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Col
,just a little suprised re Bucknall,both my wife and i attended his flydressing classes in Clerkenwell ,guess it was early 70s ,he certainly sold me a couple of the horrid veniards bobin holders which we used in the classes.
 

oldbull

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At my flytying classes in 1972 everyone was issued with a cloths peg to maintain thread tension as shown in the attached photograph. This peg dates back to those days and is the equivalent of Triggers broom.
 

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Cap'n Fishy

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You're very efficient without the bobbin Col its a joy to watch. Just curious about how you wrap the thread around your finger how does your finger stay the distance from the hook like how does it not wrap all the way to the hook? Is your finger sliding down the loop of thread?

Cheers. I had to go away and do it to see what I am doing so I could come back and answer your question. It's something you do instinctively without being aware of it!

So, I run the thread over my forefinger tip, round it and down into the palm of my hand... and from there the thread goes down to the hanging spool. The thread forms a slipping clutch, so as I wind, I just slip-feed more thread up and out from my fingertip, exactly the same as you bobbin-holder users do.

Col
 

Cap'n Fishy

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I thought you tied lefty. I think this is a major advantage when using a bobbin holder resting suspended above the desk height. Quick 2 second spin while picking up anything and I have the thread flat or twisted, ready for the next application. Do you twist the thread itself or reach down and spin the spool?

I never spin the spool. I just twizzle the thread in my fingers. I totally accept there are advantages to bobbin-holders. It's just that any time I try to use one, I just find it to be a lumpy encumbrance that gets in the way between me and the fly.

Col
 
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Cap'n Fishy

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Col
,just a little suprised re Bucknall,both my wife and i attended his flydressing classes in Clerkenwell ,guess it was early 70s ,he certainly sold me a couple of the horrid veniards bobin holders which we used in the classes.

Did he use one himself when demonstrating, Andy?

I taught fly-tying classes in the 1980s. I never used a bobbin-holder myself when demonstrating. I'm trying to remember what the folk I was teaching did. :unsure: I don't think I tried to tell them not to use one... I hope I didn't! :oops:
 

Cap'n Fishy

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I run the thread over my forefinger tip, round it and down into the palm of my hand... and from there the thread goes down to the hanging spool. The thread forms a slipping clutch, so as I wind, I just slip-feed more thread up and out from my fingertip, exactly the same as you bobbin-holder users do.

I realised in conversation with a member that the key to the 'finger' method is the lightweight spool hanging down. It's adding just the right amount of tension to create the 'slipping clutch' through the hand and onto the fly. Any extra wight (such as a bobbin-holder would add) would mess with the fine balance of the clutch. I would need to recalibrate my fingers... and I think they are too old for that now! 🤪
 
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