Tippet or Dropper?

bertie doe2

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Hello, I'm fairly new to fly fishing and I'm a bit confused over the name of the 8" length of say 6lb bs line which ties the fly to the leader. My 'go to' book is "Getting started at Fly Fishing for trout" by Alan Sefton.

On p 16 he shows an illustration of a 'one fly set-up' and he refers to this line as a tippet. On p 36 he illustrates a three fly setup and refers to the two lines as droppers.

Q1. Is tippet and dropper, interchangeable?

Q2. What's the most common breaking strength? and also length for a tippet/dropper? suitable for a beginner? TIA
Bertie
 

tobesfish

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Jun 24, 2014
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Tippet is the material that all hooks attach to, a dropper is a length of tippet that provides another end to tie an extra fly to. Droppers are made of tippet basically.

If you've come to fly fishing from coarse, just think hooklength and paternoster.
 

3lbgrayling

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You will see the length of nylon referred to as Leader-tippet-cast. they are all the same thing.Droppers are bits of nylon that are added to the leader/tippet to allow you to add more flies.(if required) but as a beginner you would be better to stick with one fly
Your 2nd question needs more information to get an answer
What are you fishing for.
what size of flies do you intend to use
rivers/small stillwaters/ lochs/ big lochs
What is the line rating of your rod.

Jim
 

john young

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Jan 29, 2017
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Hampshire
Hello, I'm fairly new to fly fishing and I'm a bit confused over the name of the 8" length of say 6lb bs line which ties the fly to the leader. My 'go to' book is "Getting started at Fly Fishing for trout" by Alan Sefton.

On p 16 he shows an illustration of a 'one fly set-up' and he refers to this line as a tippet. On p 36 he illustrates a three fly setup and refers to the two lines as droppers.

Q1. Is tippet and dropper, interchangeable?

Q2. What's the most common breaking strength? and also length for a tippet/dropper? suitable for a beginner? TIA
Bertie
Ready made leaders are usually tapered. If you knot an extra length on the end it's usually called a tippet.

Similarly the leader will gradually shorten as you remove the fly and tie on a new one. So you lengthen it back to its original length with a piece knotted on and that is then the tippet.

When you use multiple flies with one or two of them on droppers you don't want to have to lose those droppers when you have cut the 'point fly' off and replaced it several times. So you knot a tippet on before you start.

Personally I connect the tippet with a 'loop to loop' (look it up) connection. Then you can discard the gradually shortening tippet and replace it with a new one without shortening the main leader by having to tie it to the new tippet every time.
 

bertie doe2

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Joined
May 19, 2014
Messages
104
Location
S.E.Cornwall
You will see the length of nylon referred to as Leader-tippet-cast. they are all the same thing.Droppers are bits of nylon that are added to the leader/tippet to allow you to add more flies.(if required) but as a beginner you would be better to stick with one fly
Your 2nd question needs more information to get an answer
What are you fishing for.
what size of flies do you intend to use
rivers/small stillwaters/ lochs/ big lochs
What is the line rating of your rod.

Jim

Thanks Jim. Siblyback lake is also a reservoir of about 240 acres, stocked with blues and rainbows. There are browns but these have to be returned. Most of my flies are on a 12 or 14 hook. Line rating is # 5.

Looking at weekly stats and chatting to other anglers, the heaviest catches are along the eastern and southern banks. It's shallow enough to wade, there's gravel, muddy sand, weed and lots of aquatic life.

The western bank (closest to the dam) is more reservoir-like and shelves steeply to about 30'. This area is not so popular, although it is very fishable where the western bank meets the shallower northern end of the reservoir.

I find it impossible to cast into a head-wind, so to exploit the eastern bank in a strong westerly (like yesterday) I will use the boat. ps I only caught one small brown and nearly froze to death :)
 

3lbgrayling

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As a beginner don't be disappointed at casting into the wind.This is always a bit more difficult.:eek:mg:Casting with the wind at your back will be easier.But with casting into the wind, the fish should be a lot closer to the bank(sometimes)

I tend to work on the basis of no more or less than 2lb above or below the line rating(you said 5#) IE 3-7lb.but 5lb is a nice number.;)
and line breaking strain/line diameter is also tied into the size of hooks you are using.but again 5lb should be perfect

Jim
 

bertie doe2

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May 19, 2014
Messages
104
Location
S.E.Cornwall
Thanks for the tips Jim and yes I should practice more into-wind casts, there's plenty of fields close by, so no excuse. The boat does mean I can fish close to the far bank AND be casting down-wind :)

The fact that I only caught one brown yesterday is not too disheartening because the only other angler was the bailiff and he had just one 1.5 lb blue. Where were the other anglers? I guess they saw the forecast and avoided the gale.

The gulf between expert and beginner is great. I fished from the boat on Tuesday and caught one small rainbow. The weather was kinder, some sunshine and a modest westerly breeze. However, one of the local pundits, using waders and casting into wind, bagged 14 fish.

He happily showed me his set-up. 3 metre leader with Orange Foam Fritz at #1 and what looked like Clan Chief at #2 and GH Montana at point, with Intermediate WF 7 weight line. He did try and explain why he used the floating Fritz - but most of it went over my pointy head :)
 
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