Tricky casting.

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So I hope to get a cast in during the week and have a loch in mind I've fished it from a small bridge in the road and took and nice trout.
Its a lovely loch but there is alot of shrubbery and a high point to cast from..
Just wondering what type of casting to use from a height... I know it's not a great description but I think the loch has some great trout.
Gary
 
D

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Perhaps if you could take some photographs of the loch and put them up
we could give you some advice Gary.
May be going for a walk up there later weather permitting.
Many thanks.
 
D

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First consideration I’d give is where will I land a decent trout. If you are a bit higher than the water it can be tricky.
If there is little back cast a roll or steeple type cast should get you by?
The first time I fished I had to fish standing on a small bridge next to the road..
But chatting with my sister in law the loch has access through a forestry.. So hoping to have a scan later and see what I can discover.. Thanks all.
Gary
 

andygrey

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If I'm understanding you right, you need to use a 'steeple' cast. Basically a very high backcast and correspondingly low forward cast. Think about tilting the casting plane from horizontal to high at the back and low at the front.
 
D

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If I'm understanding you right, you need to use a 'steeple' cast. Basically a very high backcast and correspondingly low forward cast. Think about tilting the casting plane from horizontal to high at the back and low at the front.
Thanks Andy.. I wasn't able to go for a browse today but will hopefully get a trip up their during March have discovered a loch with access and farmers permission.. And fish in there and walkable..
But will update when I get up the the loch as its fabulous..
Thanks as always.
Gary
 

doobrysnatcher

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So I hope to get a cast in during the week and have a loch in mind I've fished it from a small bridge in the road and took and nice trout.
Its a lovely loch but there is alot of shrubbery and a high point to cast from..
Just wondering what type of casting to use from a height... I know it's not a great description but I think the loch has some great trout.
Gary
what did you catch it on ?
 

bobmiddlepoint

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Gary,
The correct cast to use from a height above the water is a long one!
You need to cast a longer line to reach a given distance than if you were at water level 😉
Rich

Further to this (see what I did there) it can also pay to have a bit of extra line off the reel to feed into the cast as it drops down onto the surface. If you don't do this as the line falls it (and the flies) get pulled back towards you. This does two things, firstly it robs you of a bit of distance and secondly it means the flies hit the water already moving towards you. With really high banks this effect can move the flies a yard or two. If you are fishing dry obviously the last thing you want (99% of the time) is drag on the fly as it lands. Even if fishing wets and pulling you often get a rise as soon as the flies land in the half second before you start pulling. I don't know why but wet flies that hit the water already moving are not as appealing as ones that are static for a split second. This is odd because once you start pulling them on the retrieve the fish like them well enough. I used to do quite a bit of fishing on lochs with high banks and saw this happen many times. I'm convinced all flies should lie still for a second or so to give nearby fish time to nail them like any other natural fly that has fallen on the water.

I used to see an extreme example of this when I was on the oars. Some people were in such a hurry to start the retrieve, particularly on windy days with a fast drift, that they would start pulling a fraction of a second before the flies had hit the water. This would result in the flies hitting the water already furrowing and they NEVER got a rise as the flies hit the water like this.


Andy
 
D

Deleted member 90002

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Further to this (see what I did there) it can also pay to have a bit of extra line off the reel to feed into the cast as it drops down onto the surface. If you don't do this as the line falls it (and the flies) get pulled back towards you. This does two things, firstly it robs you of a bit of distance and secondly it means the flies hit the water already moving towards you. With really high banks this effect can move the flies a yard or two. If you are fishing dry obviously the last thing you want (99% of the time) is drag on the fly as it lands. Even if fishing wets and pulling you often get a rise as soon as the flies land in the half second before you start pulling. I don't know why but wet flies that hit the water already moving are not as appealing as ones that are static for a split second. This is odd because once you start pulling them on the retrieve the fish like them well enough. I used to do quite a bit of fishing on lochs with high banks and saw this happen many times. I'm convinced all flies should lie still for a second or so to give nearby fish time to nail them like any other natural fly that has fallen on the water.

I used to see an extreme example of this when I was on the oars. Some people were in such a hurry to start the retrieve, particularly on windy days with a fast drift, that they would start pulling a fraction of a second before the flies had hit the water. This would result in the flies hitting the water already furrowing and they NEVER got a rise as the flies hit the water like this.


Andy
Many thanks sir.. My father taught me to always leave for a few seconds.. One thing I actually listened too..
Will try arra ge a day up at the loch take some. Pics and see what you all think..
Many thanks
Gary
 
D

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Perhaps if you could take some photographs of the loch and put them up
we could give you some advice Gary.
Here's some pics after a day on the Lough..
 

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