Trotting for grayling with a centre pin

Fozzer

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Hi I have trotted for grayling for a few years now and really enjoy it I mainly do it with a closed face reel but have a centre pin reel can someone give me some tips on how they control the float and also how the play fish with a centre pin as it is very different to using a close face reel thanks
 

bbamboo

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Using a centrepin once you get the float in the water a gentle flick with the thumb gets it started , if you feel it starting to overrun brake the drum with thumb pressure. Playing a fish is simple if you need to give line again gentle thumb pressure keeps everything under tension.
It's straight forward really.
Look on YouTube if your unsure a picture paints a thousand works, 2 thousands when it's a video. John Wilson RIP has some good stuff on centrepins.
 

jaybeegee

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Good advice from bbamboo. When I hook a fish on the ‘pin, I flick the check on to reduce the chance of an over run or a tangle around the handles.
B
 

Mrtrout

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If you’re new to it I’d seriously recommend having a Centre pin reel with a line guard, it stops all sorts of tangles.
Its a lovely way to fish it takes me back to childhood, there’s nothing quite like watching a float slide under it’s almost as good as watching a fish rise to your fly.
As B bamboo said watch a few vids of John Wilson on you tube you won’t go far wrong and have fun.
S.
 

Rhithrogena

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As above, but start with a heavier float than you would normally choose for the swim with your closed face reel. The extra mass will help with casting and will grip the water better and hold it's line better, and pull line of the reel easier. You can always switch down to a lighter float when you get the hang of it...
 

Vintage Badger

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I remember seeing a video clip of the late Reg Righyni casting a rod with centrepin reel and pulling the line down from the lower rod rings in a sort of cat's cradle affair with his left hand before casting the float and bait and letting the loops of line go. A logical but, I'd imagine, quite awkward way of putting line out to trot a bait down a river for grayling.
 

Rhithrogena

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I remember seeing a video clip of the late Reg Righyni casting a rod with centrepin reel and pulling the line down from the lower rod rings in a sort of cat's cradle affair with his left hand before casting the float and bait and letting the loops of line go. A logical but, I'd imagine, quite awkward way of putting line out to trot a bait down a river for grayling.
Very easy with a little practice. The standard centrepin cast. Way easier than fancier casts involving flicking the spool to release line...
 

jaybeegee

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I remember seeing a video clip of the late Reg Righyni casting a rod with centrepin reel and pulling the line down from the lower rod rings in a sort of cat's cradle affair with his left hand before casting the float and bait and letting the loops of line go. A logical but, I'd imagine, quite awkward way of putting line out to trot a bait down a river for grayling.
The first cast my dad taught me, I was eight I think. It’s really very easy.
B
 

Rhithrogena

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The first cast my dad taught me, I was eight I think. It’s really very easy.
B
Indeed it is. Learning to waggle your fingers to alternately pull the line from the reel and feed it into the loops formed is key, whilst maintaining a bit of tension from the supended terminal tackle. Sometimes tricky in a wind or with a very light rig.
Memories, memories....
 

Paul_B

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Its the first cast I learned (y)

My father did a lot of match fishing and could cast what sempt like miles with his Allcocks aerial reel, when trotting for trout he preferred a dust shot and a maggot.
 

kingf000

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I trot for for grayling in the winter when the rivers are too high for good fly fishing and too fast for me to get in. I use an old centrepin made by a guy in Essex that runs like a dream. As the river is quite fast running, I used a fairly large float with heavy shot around 1/2 - 1 ft above the bait with a drop shot about 3 inches above to get the bait down fast, as the grayling are feeding on the bottom. I fish slightly over depth and hold the float back. The flow at the bottom is less than on the top, so you don't want the float to drag the bait along. I find that the stripping of the line off the reel is just about right for the holding back. I do sometimes have to give a little help to get it started or if the line sticks. I rarely fish more than about 1.5 rod lengths out with my 14ft rod, so a simple overhead cast or underarm swing is fine. Just keep the line tight and has been said, prevent overrun. A line guard is good. However, I prefer having the line running off at the top of the reel, just my preference. To stop the line wrapping round the foot of the reel you need to avoid loose line, particularly when casting, and angle the reel so that any prevailing wind is blowing the line away from the rod. I've been trying out a thin braided line. It is great until you get it tangled, which it has a tendency to do after a few hours fishing!

That is how I do it, but I'm sure there are others who have a much better technique.
 

ROVER

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Its the first cast I learned (y)

My father did a lot of match fishing and could cast what sempt like miles with his Allcocks aerial reel, when trotting for trout he preferred a dust shot and a maggot.
"sempt", love it, a Yorkshire thing I assume?
 

vandiemen

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Apr 28, 2013
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London
I catch more fish when I let the hook lead the float down the swim, instead of the hook dragging behind the float along the bottom. I hold back after the initial cast just long enough to let the hook go ahead of the float. That's my tuppence worth anyway
 

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