Understanding Buzzers

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GEK79

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I seen a thing on TV about lake Victoria fly hatches, they referred to it as the smoking water and that's what it looked like, anyway during the hatches the locals put cooking oil onto basins and swing it back and fourth to coat it in flies, once they have enough they pat them together and make burgers out of them
A buzzer burger 🍔 anyone?

Al
I'll let you try one first Al..
 

bgooch

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Most fly fishers in North America who are using indicators to suspend flies deep (and Brian Chan says that the most productive zone to fish chironomid pupae usually is 12" to 18" off the bottom) use quick-release foam or plastic bobbers. Thus, they don't have the need for yarn indicators that will go thru the rod tip and rod guides, as their bobbers, when "released" by a strike and hook set, slide down the leader and don't get hung up in the rod tip, etc.
 

tangled

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Thus, they don't have the need for yarn indicators that will go thru the rod tip and rod guides, as their bobbers, when "released" by a strike and hook set, slide down the leader and don't get hung up in the rod tip, etc.

Do you have anymore information on these releasable bobbers?
 

BobP

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Most fly fishers in North America who are using indicators to suspend flies deep (and Brian Chan says that the most productive zone to fish chironomid pupae usually is 12" to 18" off the bottom) use quick-release foam or plastic bobbers. Thus, they don't have the need for yarn indicators that will go thru the rod tip and rod guides, as their bobbers, when "released" by a strike and hook set, slide down the leader and don't get hung up in the rod tip, etc.

There are two problems with this as I see it.

1) The indicators are quite large and therefore water resistant. Fish will feel the resistance and spit out the buzzer.

2) The indicator slides down the leader and has to be re-set every time a fish is caught. So it is going to be difficult to replicate the exact depth you were at. The yarn indictor stays put so after catching a fish it is re-cast and get back into action straight away.

Don't forget that anglers over there very often have something like a swivel on the leader a foot or so from the fly. This will act like a ledger stop so that the brightly coloured thingamawotsit doesn't go all the way down and bang the fish on the nose. A lot of anglers here are very sniffy about indicators full stop, so sticking a swivel into the mix is going to cause heart failure in someone.
 
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speytime

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Just a thought?
Instead of the indicator/bobbers being fixed to the line you could have like a dropper with 1" of foam cylinder in a gauge that'll fit through the guides nicely (roughly 5mm) and nail knot it to your dropper that's 20ft from the end or just tied to the loop that should let it wind in and run out with a fish on.
It would be up to you to shape below the nail knot/knot for minimal resistance at the guides?

Al
 

Elwyman

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Very good. You give a brief mention to traditional flies, such as Black Pennel. I'm sure there's a host of other traditional wet flies worthy of mention, many of which are still killer flies today. Blae and Black and Diawl Bach spring to mind. I probably catch more on Diawl Bachs than modern buzzer patterns.
 

tangled

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Diawl Bach spring to mind. I probably catch more on Diawl Bachs than modern buzzer patterns.

I reckon diawl bachs imitate both the buzzer (went fished very slowly) and the damselfly nymph (when fished a bit faster) - I catch a stack on those too. But I somehow felt it was a newish fly?
 

BobP

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Just a thought?
Instead of the indicator/bobbers being fixed to the line you could have like a dropper with 1" of foam cylinder in a gauge that'll fit through the guides nicely (roughly 5mm) and nail knot it to your dropper that's 20ft from the end or just tied to the loop that should let it wind in and run out with a fish on.
It would be up to you to shape below the nail knot/knot for minimal resistance at the guides?

Al
Complicating things slightly to my way of thinking. Having seen several videos of how Brian Chan and others go about it they target water that drops off to 10 or 12'. If I were fishing there, having been given that advice, that's where I would position my boat. I'd use a straight through leader of 15-16 feet and a weighted buzzer pattern.

The indicator would be the same as I use here. Egg yarn attached to a short length of 20lb dacron flyline backing using the New Zealand method. This is attached to the fly line at one end and the leader is attached to the other end. The indicator would be about 1" in length and well treated with floatant. In fact I'd probably make up several before I went and treat them with Watershed. That length of indicator passes through the rod rings easily enough.

The only differences between that and the set up I'd use here is a longer leader - 18-20' here - and two or three flies here as against one over there. I'd also cast slightly across the breeze so as to cover a nice arc rather than as they do which is to cast directly in front of them selves.
 

Elwyman

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I reckon diawl bachs imitate both the buzzer (went fished very slowly) and the damselfly nymph (when fished a bit faster) - I catch a stack on those too. But I somehow felt it was a newish fly?

I thought the basic Diawl Bach was a traditional Welsh fly, but yes there are many modern variants of the basic pattern. I don't know for sure, even Google didn't help me!
 

speytime

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Complicating things slightly to my way of thinking. Having seen several videos of how Brian Chan and others go about it they target water that drops off to 10 or 12'. If I were fishing there, having been given that advice, that's where I would position my boat. I'd use a straight through leader of 15-16 feet and a weighted buzzer pattern.

The indicator would be the same as I use here. Egg yarn attached to a short length of 20lb dacron flyline backing using the New Zealand method. This is attached to the fly line at one end and the leader is attached to the other end. The indicator would be about 1" in length and well treated with floatant. In fact I'd probably make up several before I went and treat them with Watershed. That length of indicator passes through the rod rings easily enough.

The only differences between that and the set up I'd use here is a longer leader - 18-20' here - and two or three flies here as against one over there. I'd also cast slightly across the breeze so as to cover a nice arc rather than as they do which is to cast directly in front of them selves.
Agreed Bob its over complicated, it's not something I've used much, in fact once while I was having a cup of tea but the type I have aren't enjoyable to cast so I've never continued using them, though it's on the cards with the lighter NZ type, i didn't realise that they could suspend weighted flies.

Thanks Al
 

BobP

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Agreed Bob its over complicated, it's not something I've used much, in fact once while I was having a cup of tea but the type I have aren't enjoyable to cast so I've never continued using them, though it's on the cards with the lighter NZ type, i didn't realise that they could suspend weighted flies.

Thanks Al

A 1.25" indicator made out of Egg yarn and well treated with floatant will support a 3mm tungsten. The ones I make up at home I treat with Watershed and leave to dry overnight. Before use they get a dollop of Gink to make sure. If I have to make up one on the waterside they just get the Gink and still float OK.

You will need to thin out the Yarn a little to make sure it pulls into the plastic tube of the NZ kit, but as the yarn will fold over and be doubled this doesn't matter. Just trim it to the required size and check that it will pass through the rod guides OK. There will be a slight juddering as it does so, but as long as I doesn't jam it's fine. I can't say that I have lost any fish through the juddering, but they are usually travelling too fast for it to be noticeable.
 

JCP

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Here in the west country they certainly buzzzzzzzzzzzz.Have seen hatches as mentioned in plumes above the trees like whirling dervishes.On reservoirs the ''Scratch''Denson type buzzers are very effective.Closer to the surface the gassed up effect achieved by some tiers comes into its own.Then there is the ubiquitous Diawl Bach in various connotations which works up or down.Mr Ellis's ''scruffy'' dubbing blends are also very effective on buzzers.I we should draw the line between buzzers and nymphs but some nymphs like pheasant tails and hares ears will take fish throughout the season whereas buzzers will fade going into summer.These nymphs tied in a buzzer format also work extremely well when buzzers are up.Long may it last... JP

1599116972011.jpeg
 

daniport

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Do you have anymore information on these releasable bobbers?
Hi Tangled, here is the link to the slip indicators. I have not seen them in Europe, only in the US.


Rgds
 

JCP

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Hi Tangled, here is the link to the slip indicators. I have not seen them in Europe, only in the US.


Rgds
Yes I have some from when Orvis Uk Stocked them in a couple of sizes.They do the job well for deeper water fishing with a team of buzzers/nymphs.One trick is to set the slip loop from the bottom of the indicator which eliminates any chance of fouling the centre pin.Yarn wins for casting especially from the bank.

JP
 

tangled

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Yes I have some from when Orvis Uk Stocked them in a couple of sizes.They do the job well for deeper water fishing with a team of buzzers/nymphs.One trick is to set the slip loop from the bottom of the indicator which eliminates any chance of fouling the centre pin.Yarn wins for casting especially from the bank.

JP

European source

 
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Rhithrogena

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Pretty sure our American cousins across the pond have been yarnwise longer than some might think.

The Dorsey Yarn Indicator -- Everything you need to know and ...troutbitten.com › 2017/03/30 › dorsey-yarn-indicator-eve...

JP
I use this method (mostly with natural sheeps wool).
Here is a link to the perfect latex bands to attach them. Super easy and cheaper than the NZ kit and plastic tubing....
 
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