Understanding Fly Lines

ohanzee

Well-known member
Joined
May 7, 2010
Messages
43,829
I think we're now discussing whether the word 'optimum' can reasonably be used to describe the weight of the line to be used for the same weight rod.

But it's been a while, I could be wrong.

Sorry I lost track a bit,

Is a 5 line 'optimum' for a 5 rod?...well someone thought so, enough to put a sticker on it.

They could just as easily go 'this works better with a 7 line, label it a 7'
 

Tangled

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2015
Messages
6,027
Is a 5 line 'optimum' for a 5 rod?...well someone thought so, enough to put a sticker on it.

Yeh, that's my take on it too. Else it's all totally meaningless (which I don't rule out).
 

PaulD

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2020
Messages
2,200
Location
South Northants
I think we're now discussing whether the word 'optimum' can reasonably be used to describe the weight of the line to be used for the same weight rod.

But it's been a while, I could be wrong.

If all rods were the same, all lines were the same, everybody fished the same way, wanted to cast the same distance and had the same casting ability . . . may be.
 

Tangled

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2015
Messages
6,027
I have perhaps (?) solved the problem of 'critical' 'optimal' wording by just not using the words. The offending section now says this:

One thing we haven't touched on - because this is about lines - are rods. We have assumed that the rod manufacturers get their line weightings right. And that there actually is a "right". This is by no means a given; determining rod weighting is far more of a subjective affair than you would imagine (see the Understanding Carbon Trout Rods thread).

Personally I think it's important to know where the line designer's 30' point is on my line.
Remember, that 30' point is the amount of line outside your rod tip that the manufacturer reckons hits the standard for your rod. Any line outside your rod tip before or after that point is less or more weight. I measure the line and mark the 30' point with a sharpie. I put another mark 10' further up (so at 40') so that I can see it when it arrives in my hand.

If you have a 9' rod, a 12' leader, 30' of line outside the tip plus another 10' or so to shoot (hence the 40’ mark) you're casting 61' from your feet. That's almost always more than enough and creates a pattern I find I need to keep my casting easy and consistent.

Of course rods don't stop working either side of that 30’, they're designed to work through a range of distances so there's no need to be obsessive about that 30’. It's just a useful visual guide.
 

rusty

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 18, 2006
Messages
1,468
Location
Warwickshire
I propose that if a line does not comply with the AFTMA standard then the manufacturer should not be allowed to label it as such.

Over the years non compliance has cost me money. I have tested a new rod with what should have been a #6 line and concluded the rod was not fit for purpose. With hindsite I consider the line was above #7.

Having read all the hype on Forty+ lines I bought a #7 floater last year. My first problem was that it would not go on a #8 reel, even without backing. So I had to buy another reel to accommodate it. Trying it on a #7 rod I concluded it was #8+ and it slowed the rod down so much it was unpleasant to use.
 

Latest posts

Top