Understanding Fly Lines

morayfisher

Trust Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2016
Messages
2,357
Location
Moray, Scotland
The SLX is a purposefully designed spey line. It's overweight compared to AFFTA but that's for a very good reason - to get some mass in the D-loop to enable a good roll/spey cast. As such, the SLX is the one you want on the river - it's fantastic for this, but poor overhead (in my opinion). The GT90 is the one I'd want on a stillwater for distance etc.
The GT90 is the only line I’ve cast to the backing, once, whilst practicing, not fishing.
Probably couldn’t do it again 😀
 

tangled

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2015
Messages
5,089
Ok, this is the sort of stuff I hoped we'd get into...

Perceived wisdom was that a DT line was best for roll casting - at least I've seen and heard that said a few times - so I was expecting the longer belly GT90 would be better at roll casting. Need a reset here.
 

tangled

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2015
Messages
5,089
A few other opinions here

“ Brant Oswald—Livington, Montana-based guide and writer: I’m delighted to respond to this one, as some of these issues with line tapers are things I discuss with guide clients and casting students all the time.

For me, the chief advantage of a double taper is that the long belly allows longer roll casts and line mends. With weight-forward lines, once the belly of the line is past the rod tip, the caster can’t impart enough energy to the running line to turn over the belly. Of course, this is the basic advantage of a weight-forward for overhead casting—to carry a shorter line in the air and shoot line for additional distance. But it limits the length of roll casts and mends, and it also means that if a caster does want to carry a longer line in the air, a haul will be required to maintain a stable loop.”

 

andygrey

Well-known member
Joined
May 20, 2006
Messages
2,925
Location
West Oxfordshire
Ok, this is the sort of stuff I hoped we'd get into...

Perceived wisdom was that a DT line was best for roll casting - at least I've seen and heard that said a few times - so I was expecting the longer belly GT90 would be better at roll casting. Need a reset here.
I think this depends if you are shooting line or not. Shooting heads and skagits etc. are regarded as the choice for distance for speys (which are essentially roll casts). A DT would be a better option if you were roll casting a long fixed length of line.
 

3lbgrayling

Well-known member
Joined
May 17, 2006
Messages
31,486
Location
Central Scotland
The SLX is a purposefully designed spey line. It's overweight compared to AFFTA but that's for a very good reason - to get some mass in the D-loop to enable a good roll/spey cast. As such, the SLX is the one you want on the river - it's fantastic for this, but poor overhead (in my opinion). The GT90 is the one I'd want on a stillwater for distance etc.

I found the SLX one of the best stillwater boat lines ive ever used. effortless distance.via overhead casts.

Jim
 

tangled

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2015
Messages
5,089
So, if for example you're wade fishing a river, across and down in the norther spider fashion, not retrieving line after the drift has finished, just circle C from the dangle and roll cast out, we're in DT/WF territory?

But if we need to chuck it further by retrieving and shooting line on the roll it's more the SLX semi-shooting head style you're after?
 

James9118

Well-known member
Joined
May 26, 2009
Messages
2,204
Location
Hampshire
I found the SLX one of the best stillwater boat lines ive ever used. effortless distance.via overhead casts.

Jim
I think this is going to be one of the problems with trying to do a 'broad brush' guide to fly lines - people are going to have very different opinions of the same line and what's best for any given application.

James
 

lavo85

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 19, 2010
Messages
1,067
On another note. Does anyone have a hot tip about how to remember what line you have on what spool?

Some reels have indicators but most seem not too. I've also seen wide elastic rings that hold the line in place and have WF 5 F written on them - are they homemade?
Wide elastic band, write what the line is.
 

ohanzee

Well-known member
Joined
May 7, 2010
Messages
41,783
So, if for example you're wade fishing a river, across and down in the norther spider fashion, not retrieving line after the drift has finished, just circle C from the dangle and roll cast out, we're in DT/WF territory?

But if we need to chuck it further by retrieving and shooting line on the roll it's more the SLX semi-shooting head style you're after?

I think many would consider a WF as semi shooting head, is it sensible to split WF's into short heavy ones to carry a short line and shoot/long heads for carrying?

You also need to include the Arrowhead/Triangle tapers.
 

morayfisher

Trust Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2016
Messages
2,357
Location
Moray, Scotland
And what is the difference between a triangle taper and a spey taper?

When I first heard the term “triangle taper” my first thought was that it might be triangular in cross section with three tiny points of contact through the rings 🤦🏼
 

ohanzee

Well-known member
Joined
May 7, 2010
Messages
41,783
And what is the difference between a triangle taper and a spey taper?

When I first heard the term “triangle taper” my first thought was that it might be triangular in cross section with three tiny points of contact through the rings 🤦🏼

No idea what a 'spey taper' is but Wulff do a 'Triangle spey taper'...just to make it proper complicated....looks like a spey taper has a very short rear taper, quite precise head of line to work with which sounds right on function...no scope to lengthen a V loop for a hauled long single spey to the horizon though.

One of my greatest bug bears has been laid to rest though, forum members are actually talking about line profiles!
 

tangled

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2015
Messages
5,089
One of my greatest bug bears has been laid to rest though, forum members are actually talking about line profiles!

But getting nowhere. Contradictions all over the place and no way I can see of resolving them.
 

taffy1

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 26, 2014
Messages
11,571
Location
Well within my comfort zone
One of my greatest bug bears has been laid to rest though, forum members are actually talking about line profiles!

No-one has yet mentioned Michael Evans' "Arrowhead" profile lines.


In the product description, eg a #7 line with the proverbial 30' extended is comparible to using a line of #8 AFFTA. A case of a misrepresented product perhaps?
 

ohanzee

Well-known member
Joined
May 7, 2010
Messages
41,783
But getting nowhere. Contradictions all over the place and no way I can see of resolving them.

Its the nature of a thing that needs untangled, I think far simpler than previous understanding threads.
 

tangled

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 28, 2015
Messages
5,089
I think many would consider a WF as semi shooting head, is it sensible to split WF's into short heavy ones to carry a short line and shoot/long heads for carrying?

So to get back to basics, in principle a totally flat line could be made that weighed 140 grains for the first 30 feet and is therefore a #5. Why is that a poorer idea than a DT, WF and SH #5? And in what circumstances?
 

aenoon

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 12, 2009
Messages
12,145
Location
Linlithgow, Scotland and anywhere i can wet a line
No-one has yet mentioned Michael Evans' "Arrowhead" profile lines.


In the product description, eg a #7 line with the proverbial 30' extended is comparible to using a line of #8 AFFTA. A case of a misrepresented product perhaps?
Basically a copy of the wulff tt lines, but slightly heavier for given rating.

Bert
 

andygrey

Well-known member
Joined
May 20, 2006
Messages
2,925
Location
West Oxfordshire
No-one has yet mentioned Michael Evans' "Arrowhead" profile lines.


In the product description, eg a #7 line with the proverbial 30' extended is comparible to using a line of #8 AFFTA. A case of a misrepresented product perhaps?
Having cast quote a few of his lines against quite a few other manufactures options, I'd say that subjectively the Arrowhead are pretty true to stated rating.
Also I think the name 'Arrowhead' was used to describe the loop shape that you can get with them rather than the profile?
Some interesting thoughts from Michael Evans' website here:- http://www.michaelevans.co.uk/advice/choosing-line/
Plus a simpler explanation...
Screenshot 2020-11-26 at 06.24.51.png
 
Last edited:

PaulD

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 11, 2020
Messages
1,800
Location
South Northants
So to get back to basics, in principle a totally flat line could be made that weighed 140 grains for the first 30 feet and is therefore a #5. Why is that a poorer idea than a DT, WF and SH #5? And in what circumstances?

When I started it was easily possible to obtain 'level' lines , you still can get level silk lines.

The simple explanation to your question is transfer of energy - far more efficient with a taper, leading to an acceptable presentation, than with a level line.
 
Top