Upstream or Downstream

3lbgrayling

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To this....obviously.....
nope don't accept that.you are just being a distraction with your reading of the text..

''As I read it the OP is casting down and feeding line as a direct opposite of casting up and taking line in. ''

You must be the only person to read it like that.

Jim
 

ohanzee

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nope don't accept that.you are just being a distraction with your reading of the text..

''As I read it the OP is casting down and feeding line as a direct opposite of casting up and taking line in. ''

You must be the only person to read it like that.

Jim
With the response...'Will try upstream today and thanks for your help'..I wouldn't imagine you meant upstream wet fly?

If I misinterpreted its a lesser distraction than the one you are making over it :)
 

3lbgrayling

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With the response...'Will try upstream today and thanks for your help'..I wouldn't imagine you meant upstream wet fly?

If I misinterpreted its a lesser distraction than the one you are making over it :)
My god is that an alan admission that he misread/did not actually properly read the OP's post.could this be a 1st for the forum.

Jim
 

taffy1

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Down & across is the preferred method when targetting migratory fish (mostly not a feeding fish, takes are usually positive when they decide to accept the offering), so why would hook-ups with non-migratory fish be tugs & splashy attempts? I've not experienced that, hungry fish need to eat.
 

ohanzee

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My god is that an alan admission that he misread/did not actually properly read the OP's post.could this be a 1st for the forum.

Jim
Actually no, unless you meant upstream wet fly you interpreted it the same as me, dry fly drifted down, it was partly your response I based it on.

But sure, if I misinterpreted its not a problem.
 

3lbgrayling

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Down & across is the preferred method when targetting migratory fish (mostly not a feeding fish, takes are usually positive when they decide to accept the offering), so why would hook-ups with non-migratory fish be tugs & splashy attempts? I've not experienced that, hungry fish need to eat.
I agree,but upstream spider wet fly is traditional in Scotland.and is very successful

Jim.
 

3lbgrayling

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Is that with the brownies or the salmon & sea trout? Doesn't work on the migratories in my river. (Stubborn b*ast*rds!)
No.your correct .mostly for the trout.but I have on occasion been successful on salmon fishing upstream when a strong upstream wind was blowing.2of my best Salmon were caught casting upstream with the wind and retrieving.

Jim
 

taffy1

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No.your correct .mostly for the trout.but I have on occasion been successful on salmon fishing upstream when a strong upstream wind was blowing.2of my best Salmon were caught casting upstream with the wind and retrieving.

Jim
Old Falkus said in his books that this tactic worked sometimes with the salmon but vary rarely on sea trout. Personally, try whatever I say, you never know when fishing, nothing is ever cast in stone, so to speak.
 

BobP

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There is something that has puzzled me. We go to great lengths in our upstream or up & across presentation to avoid drag on our dry flies, or nymphs that get drawn off track, when we are aiming to achieve a nice smooth and straight drift.

Why then is a fly or team of flies so successful when cast down & across and literally drags across the current? Natural insects, as far as I know, do not swim across a fast flowing current. Could it be that we have been barking up the wrong tree for the last two hundred years or so and drag subsurface doesn't bother the fish?
 

martinthomson

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There is something that has puzzled me. We go to great lengths in our upstream or up & across presentation to avoid drag on our dry flies, or nymphs that get drawn off track, when we are aiming to achieve a nice smooth and straight drift.

Why then is a fly or team of flies so successful when cast down & across and literally drags across the current? Natural insects, as far as I know, do not swim across a fast flowing current. Could it be that we have been barking up the wrong tree for the last two hundred years or so and drag subsurface doesn't bother the fish?
Spot on! Drag never bothers me. Yesterday all 8 fish caught in under an hour were showing drag on the surface. If fish are hungry they'll go for it. Dont overthink it. A lot of the time I think its just a reaction from the fish nothing else. But that's just me tho
 

BobP

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This shows vid some great downstream dry fly, take note of the line management 😉

I was referring to the classic wet fly down & across. I'm familiar with downstream dry fly which is referred to in detail in Charles Ritz's book, "A Fly Fisher's Life." It is particularly effective for grayling for some reason as I found in Austria a number of years ago during a blizzard of BWO's.
 

GEK79

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With the response...'Will try upstream today and thanks for your help'..I wouldn't imagine you meant upstream wet fly?

If I misinterpreted its a lesser distraction than the one you are making over it :)
I'm a little unsure if I have said something without thinking. I was glad of the advice and was going to try the dry upstream and also the down and across method.. I had been fishing small wets down the River.. Sadly the heavens had ooened and I didn't go to the river as its too dangerous.. Apologies if I wasn't clear but I was just going to go and try after reading advice.. Thanks
 

GEK79

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Not to support your.Fantastical reply.

''It is the briefest question, bit like a man having a thought before heading out the door with a rod in hand ''

WTF is this supposed to answer.

Jim
Hello mate I'm unsure if I've caused a fall out wasn't my intentions.. As I had been fishing downstream with small wets I wondered would it make a difference the various opinions and knowledge where helpful and you were right I was heading for the door as I was in the shed the heavens opened as my river is made of steep banks huge boulders cliffs and generally dangerous in the dry I avoided going.. I will try the upstream with a dry and the down and across. Many thanks and apologies..
 

jerryrum

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When casting does it matter if so why.. Many thanks..
Gary
Try both, see which catches fish.

Out of habit I tend to cast upstream (or upstream and across) when fishing wet or dry.

I have had occasions when the fish have shown no interest in this so I have switched to across and down, sometimes yielding results, sometimes not, but always worth a try.

I remember one particularly amusing / infuriating session when I had fished a river for a few hours without even a hint of a take, and switched methods as well as flies until I was almost out of ideas.

I stood mid river and took out my fly box, searching for inspiration of what to try next. In doing so my line was swept downstream behind me and as it was pulled straight the nymph was lifted up from the bottom by the floating line, all of a sudden a Trout was on and had decisively hooked itself.

I managed to drop the fly box back in my bag and reel in without losing the (admittedly small) fish.
Intrigued, I walked a few paces downstream and this time let the line flow down on purpose, again as the nymph lifted I got another hit (this one didn’t stay on).

Neither myself or my fishing partner had caught a thing all afternoon, but I managed 3 fish in about 20 minutes with this new ‘method’.

I later learnt about the ‘lift’ method, when fishing heavy wets for Grayling. I guess it’s the same effect.
 

JayP

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I was referring to the classic wet fly down & across. I'm familiar with downstream dry fly which is referred to in detail in Charles Ritz's book, "A Fly Fisher's Life." It is particularly effective for grayling for some reason as I found in Austria a number of years ago during a blizzard of BWO's.
Bob this was for the OP's benefit and not yours (y)
 

wrongfoot

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OP You get a bit of both if you cast across the river with an upstream rod mend before the line settles.

You then lead your flies through either by lifting and lowering the rod to take and give slack or stripping and then giving line to get a reasonably drag free drift of 2 full rod lengths and then as the flies fish out they tighten and fish down and across. Maybe incorporate that upstream rod mend into your downstream fishing it's a great all round tactic.

I often choose to fish upstream only tactics, usually high sticking, but almost never choose to fish only downstream or down and across tactics with a line on the water, without adding a slack drift like this first.

Obviously I'll fish any direction style that suits if I'm trying to cover a particular lie etc.
 
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