Vintage Glass rods;

Uncas

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Just happened to get my hands on a as new mint Fenwick FF857- Woodstream
1970s era 8'6'' x 7 2pc boy can it throw a line, WF7 just sails away DT7/WF8 for Sea Trout
sounds just about perfect for this rod, as we know glass can subdue fish more quickly than carbon
so I am expecting lot's of fun with it this summer.
As anyone something similar?
 

easker1

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never heard that Glass can subdue quicker than glass, I am happy with the action of my Carbon rods, easker1
 

The Squire

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Just my opinion but the resurgence of glass rods is a bit lost on me unless there has been some step change in the technology. I started fly fishing in the late 1970's on stillwaters using a fibretube rod 9'3" rated 7/8, yes I was learning of course but putting out a long line was still somewhat challenging!
Circa 1981 I had my first carbon rod, a Shakespeare which is still in the garage, it was an unbelievable difference, lighter in the hand and casting became far more pleasant so did my returns.
So I just don't get it why would you go back to glass, perhaps I can see some nostalgic short casts on a small river but stillwater; no I wouldn't dream of it!
Is it another tackle company marketing strategy?
 

Uncas

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Just my opinion but the resurgence of glass rods is a bit lost on me unless there has been some step change in the technology. I started fly fishing in the late 1970's on stillwaters using a fibretube rod 9'3" rated 7/8, yes I was learning of course but putting out a long line was still somewhat challenging!
Circa 1981 I had my first carbon rod, a Shakespeare which is still in the garage, it was an unbelievable difference, lighter in the hand and casting became far more pleasant so did my returns.
So I just don't get it why would you go back to glass, perhaps I can see some nostalgic short casts on a small river but stillwater; no I wouldn't dream of it!
Is it another tackle company marketing strategy?
Hello,

No there has been great improvement in E & S fast glass which very comparable to carbon
including lightness,
Just have a look at Sandy Nelsons website to give you an idea of modern glass.
However I also like to fish with vintage glass especially well designed ones
and there fish catching capabilities just pure fun.
 

Paul_B

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Just my opinion but the resurgence of glass rods is a bit lost on me unless there has been some step change in the technology. I started fly fishing in the late 1970's on stillwaters using a fibretube rod 9'3" rated 7/8, yes I was learning of course but putting out a long line was still somewhat challenging!
Circa 1981 I had my first carbon rod, a Shakespeare which is still in the garage, it was an unbelievable difference, lighter in the hand and casting became far more pleasant so did my returns.
So I just don't get it why would you go back to glass, perhaps I can see some nostalgic short casts on a small river but stillwater; no I wouldn't dream of it!
Is it another tackle company marketing strategy?

I swopped my last fibreglass fly rod for a carbon beach-caster, they chap who got the flyrod wanted it so he could fish near some overhead electric cables as carbon rods were banned.
 

Lewis Chessman

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Hi, Uncas, nice find!
If you want to date your rod more accurately, Fenwick was purchased by Woodstream in 1978 and 'Woodstream' decals were then added to rods. In 1982 serial numbers were omitted with 'U' (1980/81) being the last.
Any chance of some photos? Does the blank have a sort of translucent glow in strong light?
 

Uncas

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I would love to put up some photo's for you but I haven't got a clue how to do it.
Thank you for the information on serial numbers, I will check and let you know.
The rod weighs 3 5/8ths oz a deep mahogany brown and it does glow ( great )
Serial no S606395 it has two stripper guides on the bottom half and 8 snakes on the top half
including the tip top.
The tying's are a lighter brown tipped with white and the basket weave threads in front of the hook keeper, and a chocolate bronze down lock reel seat.
What year of manufacture do you think?
Regards
 

Lewis Chessman

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According to the FibreglassFRF , post #8 here, 'S' rods indicate 1978/79, so right on the cusp of the takeover. Your blank would have been designed by Jim Green and maybe made when Don Green was still production manager. He left to set up Sage at the Woodstream takeover but if your's is old stock then it has the 'old Fenwick' heritage. Jim Green joined Don at Sage as a designer a few years later and Fenwick's decline as innovative rod makers pretty much coincided with his departure.

Here's a page from F/W's 1981 Rod Building Catalogue for you:

1-2.jpg


And here's a page with a bit more info. Your rod blank equivalent is the FL102-7F with a starting weight of 2 1/2 oz. :)

1-7.jpg


3 5/8 oz for an 8 1/2 footer sounds totally fishable day in, day out to me. Sure, there are lighter rods available today, much lighter, but if you find the rod manageable and enjoy the action, well, that's what's more important, the action. And if it is a 'glow-rod', congratulations. Have a Google and see what others have said of them. :)
 

beetlebum

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Chorley
I would love to put up some photo's for you but I haven't got a clue how to do it.
Thank you for the information on serial numbers, I will check and let you know.
The rod weighs 3 5/8ths oz a deep mahogany brown and it does glow ( great )
Serial no S606395 it has two stripper guides on the bottom half and 8 snakes on the top half
including the tip top.
The tying's are a lighter brown tipped with white and the basket weave threads in front of the hook keeper, and a chocolate bronze down lock reel seat.
What year of manufacture do you think?
Regards
I don't know whether this is the same rod but I very nearly bought one on eBay last week, it still had the sticker on the grip! I was reading up about it on the US forums and there is a lot of love for them. Enjoy.
 

matt808

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Beachcaster? I'm sure you're better sticking with carbon.
Small stream rod under 7'? Glass all the way.
7'6" ish seems to be the crossover point where glass and carbon can both make nice rods. (which load properly and cast accuratley with the designated line weight)
 

matt808

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In a 9' length is where the advantages of
Just my opinion but the resurgence of glass rods is a bit lost on me unless there has been some step change in the technology. I started fly fishing in the late 1970's on stillwaters using a fibretube rod 9'3" rated 7/8, yes I was learning of course but putting out a long line was still somewhat challenging!
Circa 1981 I had my first carbon rod, a Shakespeare which is still in the garage, it was an unbelievable difference, lighter in the hand and casting became far more pleasant so did my returns.
So I just don't get it why would you go back to glass, perhaps I can see some nostalgic short casts on a small river but stillwater; no I wouldn't dream of it!
Is it another tackle company marketing strategy?
In a 9' length is where the advantages of glass are lost.
Short casts with short rods carbon does not seem to be able to cast a leader off the tip in the same way glass can.
 

Uncas

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Matt,

I agree up to a point, but consider the new glass manufacturers such as
Livingstone, McFarland, Steffen, are all making very light rods to 8'6''/9'.
In particular North Fork Composites with their Iconoglass blanks an
8'6'' x 12wt only weighs in at 4oz, a lot more people are buying glass
for saltwater fishing because it won't shatter and break like carbon.
And you get a similar weight rod at half the going rate of a Sage.
 

matt808

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Matt,

I agree up to a point, but consider the new glass manufacturers such as
Livingstone, McFarland, Steffen, are all making very light rods to 8'6''/9'.
In particular North Fork Composites with their Iconoglass blanks an
8'6'' x 12wt only weighs in at 4oz, a lot more people are buying glass
for saltwater fishing because it won't shatter and break like carbon.
And you get a similar weight rod at half the going rate of a Sage.
Good points Uncas

I'd like to try a YS Livingston, I've got a shorter Livingston glass which is really nice.
 

Uncas

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Yes that sounds interesting, YS Livingston are building 8'8'' and 9' 3 & 4 weights
at the moment Matt.
 

stevel

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A friend of mine in Slovenia uses old Hardy Fibatube 10wt rods to fish for pike on fly.
He uses really heavy sinktips (think Teeny 500+) for slinging out really big flies up to 12" long to subdue big pike to 20lb+ and the fiberglass handles it no problem.
I also found an old clip of the tuna fishermen with solid glass ? rods of the early last century basically hooking then pulling them in one motion into the boat - they were monsters probably 50lb each - no way carbon or even bamboo could have handled that sort of brutality.
I'm glass curious at present, I think they will complement rather than replace my bamboos.
 
Last edited:
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GEK79

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A friend of mine in Slovenia uses old Hardy Fibatube 10wt rods to fish for pike on fly.
He uses really heavy sinktips (think Teeny 500+) for slinging out really big flies up to 12" long to subdue big pike to 20lb+ and the fiberglass handles it no problem.
I also found an old clip of the tuna fishermen with solid glass ? rods of the early last century basically hooking then pulling them in one motion into the boat - they were monsters probably 50lb each - no way carbon or even bamboo could have handled that sort of brutality.
I'm glass curious at present, I think they will complement rather than replace my bamboos.
Without taking away from the thread those tuna were actually caught by hand using a solid glass rod.. What price would you pay for the tuna now that was caught on a rod and not lined..
Im awaiting a cheap glass rod to try before and if I take the more expensive steps. My dad used glass when he was a little younger and says bombproof.. And handle most things.
 

stevel

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Without taking away from the thread those tuna were actually caught by hand using a solid glass rod.. What price would you pay for the tuna now that was caught on a rod and not lined..
Im awaiting a cheap glass rod to try before and if I take the more expensive steps. My dad used glass when he was a little younger and says bombproof.. And handle most things.
Yes you're correct, those clips show men using solid bamboo or fiberglass poles.
However I did find some modern clips of some fishing fleets (South East Asia?) using fiberglass poles, most probably solid, catching albacore in the manner they did nearly 100 years ago off the US west coast.
Quite frankly I'd prefer to eat fish caught in this manner, even if it was more expensive, as opposed to fish caught by the dredge trawlers sucking up everything and throwing away 90% of bycatch.
 
G

GEK79

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Yes you're correct, those clips show men using solid bamboo or fiberglass poles.
However I did find some modern clips of some fishing fleets (South East Asia?) using fiberglass poles, most probably solid, catching albacore in the manner they did nearly 100 years ago off the US west coast.
Quite frankly I'd prefer to eat fish caught in this manner, even if it was more expensive, as opposed to fish caught by the dredge trawlers sucking up everything and throwing away 90% of bycatch.
Me too..
 

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