Wading Staff - What Has Worked For You

dcb

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Aug 13, 2015
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Midlothian
Looking at getting a wading staff, trouble is, having had a look about I'm not sure which ones work best. So, what has worked for you.

Thanks in advance.

DCB
 

Tangled

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Dec 28, 2015
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If you can use a one piece stick, people generally reckon that the Sharpes is the leader.

Opinions vary on the collapsable ones. I have the SIMMS and rate it. My mate has the Orvis one and likes it. Whatever you get make sure it's got a locking pin, otherwise they tend to be really collapsable.

Avoid the cheap ones that you'll see with different brands and different shaped handles but are essentially the same, I had one and it literally fell apart in the river.
 

morayfisher

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Moray, Scotland
I’ve bought one of these for next season as I want one that folds away when not needed.


It locks when extended and the connecting cable is plastic coated, not just a bit of elastic.
Probably would have bought Simms if money were no object.
I’ve also got a one piece staff but don’t intend to be doing any wading in deep and/or fast water.
 

PaulD

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Feb 11, 2020
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South Northants
I have one of these, a Fishpond Slippery Rock. It's a good few years old now and has been very good.

fishpond-slippery-rock-pro-wading-staff-21409010.jpg
 

bobfly2

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Jul 11, 2015
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I use a three section carbon fibre walking pole which has an outside over-centre fastening at the two joints. Made by Karrimor but other makes do them. Very good tunsten carbide tip.Twist fix joints with an internal expanding collar get jammed or get slippy but an external lever type is much better with cold wet fingers.
 

eddleston123

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Nov 3, 2012
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Peebles, Scottish Borders
A Snowbee Telescopic for me. I've been using one for many years now.

Strong, Robust and at around the forty quid mark great value.

Collapsible wading staff may have their place, but I wouldn't recommend one for a strong flow spate river with a rocky bed.



Douglas
 

zulu fly

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Jul 19, 2009
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CARMARTHEN - River Towy
ITS YOUR LIFE THAT MATTERS when wading!!

I had no confidence in an adjustable height staff I had, as it kept on slipping which ever way i tightened it up so it was discarded. I then picked up a vintage one piece Hardy wading staff and have never looked back.

Sharpes of Aberdeen
have a one piece with measurement scale on it for your trophy fish.

The H/D Staff weighs 2lb 06oz and is 54" long and costs £55
The Medium staff weighs 1lb 14oz and is 54" long and costs £48

BUT do not use a straight lanyard as in an emergency you need your staff very close at hand i.e. by your side NOT 2' away from you!


Therefore also buy a Gear Keeper wading staff retractor the cost is £25

I hope this helps.

Regards
Euros Jones
 

micka

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Apr 12, 2010
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1,073
If you can use a one piece stick, people generally reckon that the Sharpes is the leader.

Opinions vary on the collapsable ones. I have the SIMMS and rate it. My mate has the Orvis one and likes it. Whatever you get make sure it's got a locking pin, otherwise they tend to be really collapsable.

Avoid the cheap ones that you'll see with different brands and different shaped handles but are essentially the same, I had one and it literally fell apart in the river.
Ditto the Simms but I don't collapse it and it's always in one solid state - it's then a third leg on the bank (walking with wading boots aint the best grip on mud) and the moment you enter the water - saved me many a dunking.

I think it was Michael Evans (in one of his casting DVDs) who reminded us that the slippiest parts of the river are the shallow margins where weed and algal growth is greater.

Mick
 
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BobP

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Oct 28, 2007
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Wiltshire
The only place I use one is in Austria and so the issue is getting it there. The airlines will look a bit sideways at a one piece job before consigning it to the rubbish bin therefore the folding jobs that can be transported in the hold luggage determine what I can use.
 

Elwyman

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May 18, 2006
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North Wales
Sharpes of Aberdeen staff is bullet proof, if you are wading tricky rivers, like parts of the Dee or Spey, and need to lean heavily on your staff, rest assured it won't collapse.
Telescopic ones are probably best for easy wading and probing water depth,
 
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Overmiwadrers

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Mar 25, 2018
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535
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Yorkshire
Bloke in our fishing club makes them. Stag antler handle blackthorn staff with lead insert for weight . I have a few of different weights , Long walks less weight Fast water more weight . They are a thing of beauty and very practical. Had a folding job I hated it....

O M W
 

ACW

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May 17, 2006
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In between the old and new Arsenal grounds
Sharpes of Aberdeen staff is bullet proof, if you are wading tricky rivers, like parts of the Dee or Spey, and need to lean heavily on your staff, rest assured it won't collapse.
Telescopic ones are probably best for easy wading and probing water depth,
The bog standard sharpes works well ,for less pushy water the Wilco suits me and my son!
folders ,no thanks!
 

speytime

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Feb 27, 2009
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West Lothian Scotland
I've been given 3/4 wading staffs over the years, they look really nice with their carved salmon and deer horn handles, brass ferrules etc but I lift a trekking stick every time it's perfect as I'm looking for light.
If it was necessary I would lift a stronger weighted one but I've used trekking poles for years now and never been let down using it in rivers like the Tay, Spey and Tweed among others, to me a wading staff is only prod and a lean I don't feel the need for more strength than my trecker can offer.
If I sit it at 45ish to the current it does not budge.

Al
 

iainmortimer

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Apr 5, 2014
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3,359
Location
West Sussex
If you can use a one piece stick, people generally reckon that the Sharpes is the leader.

Opinions vary on the collapsable ones. I have the SIMMS and rate it. My mate has the Orvis one and likes it. Whatever you get make sure it's got a locking pin, otherwise they tend to be really collapsable.

Avoid the cheap ones that you'll see with different brands and different shaped handles but are essentially the same, I had one and it literally fell apart in the river.
I agree with this totally. I have the heavier of the two Sharpes one’s and it is an excellent bit of kit. The lanyard is a good length and comfortable to wear and it has saved me from a dunking many times both when tripping over rocks and when wading strong currents when it is a good brace. I was steered away from collapsible staffs and am glad so was because there have also been a couple of times when I got it jammed and had to exert some pressure to free it and I suspect a collapsible one would done just that.

Not just for wading support thiugy because it’s also great to lean on heavily when stepping off a bank with tricky access,l and I’ve braced it between trees to help pull myself up steep banks.

I wouldn’t be without it amd while heavy, it’s not so heavy as to feel cumbersome.
 
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