Walnut Splice protector

stevel

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Could anyone handy with wood be able to make me a walnut splice protector (or set) if I gave you the dimensions (for a cost obviously)?
I did a quick trip to the Wye in Monmouth (I'm happy to say I was successful and have now ticked the "Wye salmon" off my list) over the weekend however I lost one of the walnut splice protectors for my bamboo rod.

Thanks,
Steve
 

stevel

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OK I'm going to see if I can make one.
I've found a source for walnut dowels, I only have to try and plane it, using the measurements from another splice.
Anyone have a scarfing block they could lend me? :p
I did actually just watch Bob Clay's masterclass on bamboo rods (for interest only) and there was a chapter on making splices.
 

easker1

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cut the first face on the splice protector with a fine saw then plane it, I use a similar style for repairing broken arrows, I made an open box to take the arrow and then made the angle cut similar to a Mitre box, I use a saw which is 10 thou thick it's for fretting banjos or Guitars, easker1
 

stevel

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Thanks, I think it's going to be a learning process! Cutting the 12mm dowels is going to be a task, I'm going to try a method similar to what's on Bob Clay's video.
I'm going to clamp the dowel between 2 blocks of wood in my workbench with the dowel at the required angle. Then I just plane away until the dowel is flat with the 2 blocks of wood. I also have an electric planer so may use this to get the level down sufficiently before hand planing if hand planing the whole thing is too much of a chore. Then finish off with sandpaper/wet'n'dry.
Luckily I've bought a few in case I screw up! :p
 

stevel

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Well I was all set to have a go at planing those walnut dowels, I'd bought some danish oil and found where my old plane was in the shed and dusted off my old workbench.
Then I got pinged by Jim (@jimmcl ) suggesting I could 3D print the splices.
I was intrigued.. "print" a splice? Jim said I could do a drawing in a CAD program and print out the drawing to a 3D printer. I'm computer literate but CAD/CAM is not my thing, Jim offered to take my measurements and load up a drawing into Freecad and have a go at printing a few out.
He's finished and here are the results of the exercise. Amazing. What a brave new world we are in now.
I still want to do the hand planed version, but I think the high-tech version will hold up very well indeed. Apparently you can even get Wood PLA, which makes the printed object look and feel like real wood, which can be sanded just like normal wood.
splices finished.jpg
 

GEK79

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Well I was all set to have a go at planing those walnut dowels, I'd bought some danish oil and found where my old plane was in the shed and dusted off my old workbench.
Then I got pinged by Jim (@jimmcl ) suggesting I could 3D print the splices.
I was intrigued.. "print" a splice? Jim said I could do a drawing in a CAD program and print out the drawing to a 3D printer. I'm computer literate but CAD/CAM is not my thing, Jim offered to take my measurements and load up a drawing into Freecad and have a go at printing a few out.
He's finished and here are the results of the exercise. Amazing. What a brave new world we are in now.
I still want to do the hand planed version, but I think the high-tech version will hold up very well indeed. Apparently you can even get Wood PLA, which makes the printed object look and feel like real wood, which can be sanded just like normal wood.
View attachment 40862
New technology meets old.. Amazing really.
 

alfie trout

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Could anyone handy with wood be able to make me a walnut splice protector (or set) if I gave you the dimensions (for a cost obviously)?
I did a quick trip to the Wye in Monmouth (I'm happy to say I was successful and have now ticked the "Wye salmon" off my list) over the weekend however I lost one of the walnut splice protectors for my bamboo rod.

Thanks,
Steve
Hi Steve
just read your request excuse my ignorance could you tell me what a splice protector is and what it is used for as it’s something I’ve never heard of
thanks Gary.
 

stevel

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Hi Gary,
Probably about 100 years ago the splice joint was invented, two sections of a rod are sliced at an angle and the 2 sections fit together and are bound together - in the early days this was wet leather these days it's normally clear hockey tape.
The joint has made a revival in the past 20 years or so, since it makes for a bamboo rod with more of a one piece feel.
When the rod is broken down, the ends become susceptible to damage due to the very fine slim tips. A splice protector fits up against the splice with the thick end of the protector against the slim tapered tip and bound to it with a cord attached to the protector.
Cheers
Steve
 

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Vintage Badger

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Well I was all set to have a go at planing those walnut dowels, I'd bought some danish oil and found where my old plane was in the shed and dusted off my old workbench.
Then I got pinged by Jim (@jimmcl ) suggesting I could 3D print the splices.
I was intrigued.. "print" a splice? Jim said I could do a drawing in a CAD program and print out the drawing to a 3D printer. I'm computer literate but CAD/CAM is not my thing, Jim offered to take my measurements and load up a drawing into Freecad and have a go at printing a few out.
He's finished and here are the results of the exercise. Amazing. What a brave new world we are in now.
I still want to do the hand planed version, but I think the high-tech version will hold up very well indeed. Apparently you can even get Wood PLA, which makes the printed object look and feel like real wood, which can be sanded just like normal wood.
View attachment 40862
Looks like you are getting ready to tackle a vampire infestation with that lot!

Joking aside, I've always thought that spliced rods look like something that shouldn't work! It shows looks can be deceiving; having said that, all my split cane rods have ferrules... just in case!
 

stevel

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Alexander Grant made greenheart rods with splices and could cast prodigious distances with it, his record stood till only a very short time ago by modern casters weilding superlight carbon composite rods and modern lines.
Many of the new bamboo spey makers say that splices are better for bamboo rods which are spey cast due to the pressure on the bamboo near the joint due to the stiff metal ferrule.
Some continue to make their rods with metal ferrules maintaining there is no problems with this joint type, but I reserve those for coarse trotting rods requiring no spey casts.
 

Vintage Badger

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Alexander Grant made greenheart rods with splices and could cast prodigious distances with it, his record stood till only a very short time ago by modern casters weilding superlight carbon composite rods and modern lines.
Many of the new bamboo spey makers say that splices are better for bamboo rods which are spey cast due to the pressure on the bamboo near the joint due to the stiff metal ferrule.
Some continue to make their rods with metal ferrules maintaining there is no problems with this joint type, but I reserve those for coarse trotting rods requiring no spey casts.
As we know, Spey casting rolls a rod and this isn't meant to be good for split cane rods, particularly vintage ones where this action can allegedly lead to delamination of the glued sections. Weren't spliced joints brought in to try and counter this originally, allowing the roll flexation to be transferred evenly down the whole rod? I believe modern day glues are better than the those from yesteryear, so modern day cane rod makers may be correct in saying there's no problem?
 

bonefishblues

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Could anyone handy with wood be able to make me a walnut splice protector (or set) if I gave you the dimensions (for a cost obviously)?
I did a quick trip to the Wye in Monmouth (I'm happy to say I was successful and have now ticked the "Wye salmon" off my list) over the weekend however I lost one of the walnut splice protectors for my bamboo rod.

Thanks,
Steve
Hold on, you can't just gloss over that...
 

stevel

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As we know, Spey casting rolls a rod and this isn't meant to be good for split cane rods, particularly vintage ones where this action can allegedly lead to delamination of the glued sections. Weren't spliced joints brought in to try and counter this originally, allowing the roll flexation to be transferred evenly down the whole rod? I believe modern day glues are better than the those from yesteryear, so modern day cane rod makers may be correct in saying there's no problem?
I'm not sure if delamination was one of the reasons for the splice, but yes I'm sure modern glues has reduced the incidence of these sorts of issues.
Sharpes' Scottie spliced rods have been around a long time (from probably 60-70 years) and many are still being used today, as have the original greenheart Grant Vibration rods.
I believe that the splice allows the joint to flex, whereas a metal ferrule would cause a stiff spot at the joint. Bob Clay, who makes modern, spliced, hollowed spey rods for salmon and steelhead, says that he started suffering breaks above or below the metal ferrules before investigating the spliced joint.
For sure there hasn't been a long period for these new bamboo spey rods to prove themselves, but as far as I'm aware you can do any new modern spey cast, and the only proviso is that very heavy sinking lines or heads (eg T14+) shouldn't be used, or rolled to the surface first before executing the spey cast. Bob Clay also makes a bamboo rod with a composite ferrule (either graphite, fibreglass or a mix) and he says this should only be used with floating lines.
I've been casting them for 10 years now and haven't suffered any breaks or delamination.
 
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stevel

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Hold on, you can't just gloss over that...
Ha!
I've been a member of the Wye Salmon association for many years now, supporting them on the preservation of the river and its salmon.
They have a scheme to "Get more rods on the River" and so offer some good beats like BigsWeir on a lottery system (as well as other beats by a booking system). I decided to take them up on their offer this year and miraculously drew 26th June. All the stars seemed to align, as we opened up from CV19 lockdown, there were heavy rains the week or so before my date and was receding as my date approached, and there was a king tide on my day.
I arranged to stay the night (or two so I could meet up with my friend from Bath) and arranged to meet the Syndicate Leader Peter on the morning. The tide was rapidly rising when I arrived at 8, and Peter said I had a maximum of 30 minutes before it would be over! I rapidly donned my waders, taped up my bamboo rod (and in so doing probably lost my splice in the bushes) and had enough time to do one pass of the run which he said was the best run in the Beat. We didn't see any fish nor were there any touches to the fly. By the time I got to the end of the short run, the tide was up, and it was unfishable until it started running out in a couple of hours.
Luckily I had to miss breakfast to get there at 8, so returned to the Inn for a fine Full English and returned to the river at 10. Peter took me to another beat, and it was a lovely beat, with lots of features and very nice flows. I started off making some short casts, then gradually lengthening it to the distance where Peter said my fly should be swinging.
I worked my way down, getting the cobwebs out from a a year and a half of lockdown, and as I reached the end of the run, I got a knock on the fly as it came round to the dangle. It ran a few yards then stopped, and I lifted into a nice solid hookhold. The fish took off, stripping line from the drum drag reel, and I fought it back to the shore after about 20 minutes or so. It was a strong fish, I thought it was much larger than it was; Peter said to me afterwards that it was characteristic of Wye fish, very strong for their size, I guess being so close to the sea.
It taped at 32" which Peter guessed at 11lb. It was very silver fish, though no sea lice; Peter guessed it had been in the river a couple of weeks. I thought it would be in the high teens the way it fought. I'd caught a 10kg fish in Iceland a few years back and it didn't fight anywhere near as well as this fish. I was super chuffed, ignoring the social distancing (we are both double jabbed so ok!) we hugged in delight for landing this rare Wye fish!
If I had an opportunity to have a place on this syndicate on the Wye, I'd grab it with both hands!
20210626_111859.jpg
 
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stevel

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Excellent - that's a truly lovely fish. A little reminiscent of Hampshire Avon fish to look at?
I haven't seen any Hampshire Avon fish, though possibly will in the coming season as my friend has taken a spot on Neil Freeman's syndicate, but the fish look similar to the Dorset Avon fish - short and deep; another place I'd love to fish in the coming seasons!
 
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