Wanna be a fishing guide?

clag

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Jun 22, 2008
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I think as @PaulD points out, the FB Guide School 'prospectus' is thick on promises and thin on detail and content.
As for casting qualifications, they are exactly that, casting qualifications though I think that the amount of emphasis on teaching that all the 3 major qualifications contain in their syllabuses and assessments isn't always fully appreciated by those not familiar with them.
It's not just about being able to cast...
Do you think it might just be possible that someone about to pay £2.5k might have the whit to phone FB and ask?

Regards

CLaG
 

caeran

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Jun 29, 2012
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Maybe make it a two week course with 3 days in the classroom debating fluorocarbon versus nylon and associated chemical formulas and refraction of light indexes


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codyarrow

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Just about enough to enable me to not quite make a living!
That is what I thought. So adding 12 weak wannabees per year is not good for business. It could be significant? Particularly if they get a few gigs, give bad experiences, and taint the over all pot.
 

andygrey

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That is what I thought. So adding 12 weak wannabees per year is not good for business. It could be significant? Particularly if they get a few gigs, give bad experiences, and taint the over all pot.
It takes a lot of time to build up a guiding business unless you go straight into working for an outfit like FB.
I'd say about 50% of my work comes from word of mouth recommendations, the rest is as a result of people finding my website and repeat business plus relationships I've worked hard on developing over the years with various waters and fishing clubs, often doing stuff for free or at a very discounted rate. Pre Covid there was a lot of business from overseas anglers (mainly from the US).
The guiding world is pretty small and the majority of us know and respect each other and pass work around rather than stepping on other people toes. There is of course always the odd one that pops up from nowhere with sharp elbows but they don't tend to last that long.
 

easker1

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years ago it used to be £90,I was already doing Guiding and Gillying I gillied for Charles Bingham, and he suggested that I took the Apgi test but I declined I had already been on the SANA course, and I didn't have the time to go on other courses, I enjoyed doing it and I am pleased I did it but as I said it was £90 then, easker1
 

andygrey

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years ago it used to be £90,I was already doing Guiding and Gillying I gillied for Charles Bingham, and he suggested that I took the Apgi test but I declined I had already been on the SANA course, and I didn't have the time to go on other courses, I enjoyed doing it and I am pleased I did it but as I said it was £90 then, easker1
I did work out how much my GAIC cost me a few years ago, from memory it was around £4k all in.
This includes the cost of a mentor, travel, the assessment itself, various residential GAIA courses and events, reference material, several fly lines and a new rod...
I think in terms of 'hours', from start to finish probably equated to the thick end of around 2,000
 

ROVER

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The guiding world is pretty small and the majority of us know and respect each other and pass work around rather than stepping on other people toes. There is of course always the odd one that pops up from nowhere with sharp elbows but they don't tend to last that long.
Haven't you just summarised the crux of the matter?

Whether or not an aspiring guide chooses to do the FB course. or, decides to start up with no 'formal' training, the fact of the matter is if he isn't very good he wont last long, the same as any profession.

Whether he chose to spend 2.5K with FB on trying to gain a bit more knowledge of how to communicate more effectively with clients and the likes is his business, and if it soon transpires he isn't cutting the mustard then he probably wouldn't see a return on his investment and have to pack it in. By the same token, if a potential customer isn't diligent enough to check out the guides credentials in terms of customer satisfaction, feedback, etc, then I'd say he's a fool too if willing to part with 2 or 300 quid to find out.

So basically, Id say the impact on the potential earnings of an existing successful guiding business is minimal to zero if the new guy turns out to be shite, he'll be gone in a few months anyway, conversely if he turns out to be successful and this is partly down to having taken away a few pearls of wisdom from such a course, then everyone's a winner surely?, except for the existing guide who's custom might drop due to the new guy succeeding, and that should lead him to ask why and sharpen his game.

Isn't that how the personal service industry works???

G
 

andygrey

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Haven't you just summarised the crux of the matter?

Whether or not an aspiring guide chooses to do the FB course. or, decides to start up with no 'formal' training, the fact of the matter is if he isn't very good he wont last long, the same as any profession.

Whether he chose to spend 2.5K with FB on trying to gain a bit more knowledge of how to communicate more effectively with clients and the likes is his business, and if it soon transpires he isn't cutting the mustard then he probably wouldn't see a return on his investment and have to pack it in. By the same token, if a potential customer isn't diligent enough to check out the guides credentials in terms of customer satisfaction, feedback, etc, then I'd say he's a fool too if willing to part with 2 or 300 quid to find out.

So basically, Id say the impact on the potential earnings of an existing successful guiding business is minimal to zero if the new guy turns out to be shite, he'll be gone in a few months anyway, conversely if he turns out to be successful and this is partly down to having taken away a few pearls of wisdom from such a course, then everyone's a winner surely?, except for the existing guide who's custom might drop due to the new guy succeeding, and that should lead him to ask why and sharpen his game.

Isn't that how the personal service industry works???

G
My objection to the FB Guide School isn't due to it bringing more guides into the market place... it's a free and unregulated industry. I have had quite a few people come to me for help and advice setting themselves up as guides and instructors and the 2 main things I stress to them (apart from the fact that the reality of 'guiding' is generally very different to the perception...) is 'Get qualified' and 'Learn the waters you intend to guide on better than the back of your hand, in all conditions and all times of the year'. Both of these can only be achieved with a lot of time and effort. A week long course may add a bit of polish to someone who has already put in the leg work but it's not being sold as that, rather a quick and easy way in.
As for potential customers, some of those who find guides via the internet do a bit more research than others but a snazzy website is often enough for your average punter to book and pay for a day.
 

easker1

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Know your Guest and know your area,I have guests of 19 to 90, literally I had an old lady who's son had bought her a fly fishing kit from Hardys I managed to get her roll casting, but she couldn't lift in to an overhead cast, but she ended up casting a decent roll cast,I was in my 60's at the time,she went off as happy as larry, to fish further north, I met some great people and still have some as friends(at least that's what is says on the Xmas cards?) easker1
 

ChrisAldred68

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I only know of one guide/instructor (wished I known earlier before I booked with him myself :rolleyes: ) that wasn't value for money. It wasn't that he was bad, infact he was good, just that he disappeared for half hour out of a 2 hour tuition session. Then there were the phone calls. ☹️ This just didn't happen to me. It also happened to a guy doing his guiding/instructors ticket, he used this guide/instructor for mentorship, GAIA. I believe the guide/instructor received some very strong words and docked half hour pay. (y)
Trying to remember if I did this to you? Although I don't recall ever having my fee docked
 
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ROVER

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My objection to the FB Guide School isn't due to it bringing more guides into the market place... it's a free and unregulated industry. I have had quite a few people come to me for help and advice setting themselves up as guides and instructors and the 2 main things I stress to them (apart from the fact that the reality of 'guiding' is generally very different to the perception...) is 'Get qualified' and 'Learn the waters you intend to guide on better than the back of your hand, in all conditions and all times of the year'. Both of these can only be achieved with a lot of time and effort. A week long course may add a bit of polish to someone who has already put in the leg work but it's not being sold as that, rather a quick and easy way in.
As for potential customers, some of those who find guides via the internet do a bit more research than others but a snazzy website is often enough for your average punter to book and pay for a day.
If any fly angler believes by attending the course on offer that he will become an instant guide then in my opinion he:

a. Is a complete nugget and deserves to be relieved of his 2.5k.
b. Shouldn't be allowed to hold money, nor leave their normal daily surrounds for a week (probably one day) without proper supervision.
- "buyer beware".

G
 
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andygrey

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If any fly angler believes by attending the course on offer that he will become an instant guide then in my opinion he:

a. Is a complete nugget and deserves to be relieved of his 2.5k.
b. Shouldn't be allowed to hold money, nor leave their normal daily surrounds for a week (probably one day) without proper supervision.

What was it you used to write on a receipt when you sold your knackered old car on to someone else in the days when kids drove bangers and didn't have 70 Reg Mercs on finance as their first car - "buyer beware".

G
This is the problem... It is by intimation suggesting that you will walk out as a guide.
 

ROVER

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If any fly angler believes by attending the course on offer that he will become an instant guide then in my opinion he:

a. Is a complete nugget and deserves to be relieved of his 2.5k.
b. Shouldn't be allowed to hold money, nor leave their normal daily surrounds for a week (probably one day) without proper supervision

G
This is the problem... It is by intimation suggesting that you will walk out as a guide.
Agree, but See notes A & B above
 

wrongfoot

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Dec 2, 2007
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What's the going rate for a guided day out not including cost of tickets, boat hire, catering etc. ?

Similar guide rate for river, stillwater, salmon?
 
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