Want slightly more distance

pragmatist

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I am an experienced caster so no advice needed there. I have the 9’6” Sage X 5w and want to know if loading 6w line will give me a better experience on the large windswept Elan valley reservoirs? I’ve never really loaded one weight up but am curious. Don’t want a 6w rod either as I enjoy the fight my 5w gives me with those small brownies.
 

pati

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Depends on your casting style:

If you carry a lot of line in the air you risk overloading your rod and losing distance

If you just take out of the rod tip the optimal length of line and then shoot, you may get a more powerful shoot and gain a bit of distance
 

PaulD

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It really depends upon what you are trying to achieve and how much more is 'slightly more distance' and from what distance you're presently casting. A 6wt line, on average should weigh around 1.35g more than a 5wt - a quarter of a teaspoon of sugar - very little. It may be worth investigating differing profiles of lines.
 

colliedog

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You could consider one of the short headed lines in a 5# if available. Because all the weight is compressed into a short head they feel half a weight heavy and load and shoot well. I use a Wychwood distance rocket taper #6 on a 6wt and it flies effortlessly. Barrio SLX and airflo 40+ would be similar.
 

GEK79

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It really depends upon what you are trying to achieve and how much more is 'slightly more distance' and from what distance you're presently casting. A 6wt line, on average should weigh around 1.35g more than a 5wt - a quarter of a teaspoon of sugar - very little. It may be worth investigating differing profiles of lines.
Could a double taper help here..?
 

PaulD

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Barrio SLX and airflo 40+ would be similar.
With the Barrio SLX you would be effectively 'over-lining' with a 5wt.

The 5wt AFTM scale for a 5 wt is 140 (+/- 6) grains - 9.07g for 30ft

The Barrio SLX 5wt is 185 grains - 12g for 33ft, which matches AFTM 7 on the AFTM scale.

 

geenomad

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I have the 9’6” Sage X 5w and want to know if loading 6w line will give me a better experience on the large windswept Elan valley reservoirs?
I have the same rod mate. Very classy stick imho. I have tried a variety of lines with it and unless your "extra distance" is into the next county I wouldn't be concerned about overlining it. I don't know the place or conditions you mention but I have cast an SLX "5"wt with it and the X 597 actually smoothes out some of the clunks I get overhead with a faster action 5wt rod.

I like mine best with a 5wt GT125. It's an elegant experience at 85' plus and quite capable of 100' plus, but who casts anywhere near that far when fishing? Not a rod to be rushed and very sweet when it's treated right.:cool:

Cheers
Mark
 

colliedog

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With the Barrio SLX you would be effectively 'over-lining' with a 5wt.

The 5wt AFTM scale for a 5 wt is 140 (+/- 6) grains - 9.07g for 30ft

The Barrio SLX 5wt is 185 grains - 12g for 33ft, which matches AFTM 7 on the AFTM scale.

In strict terms of the AFTM scale you are correct but I question whether you are necessarily over lining the rod (in terms of absolute line weight) to the extent you suggest. What it highlights is the inadequacy of the AFTM system. In practical terms most lines have a head length of 35-40', some longer. That is what we use to load our rods. Stick with the 7wt analogy as the number is to hand. The first 30, will weigh 12g. At 35-40' The head weight is ( roughly, not allowing for tapers) 15-17g not the 12g of the AFTM scale. That is what we are casting with, that is what a 7wt rod is designed to cast with, so it makes perfect sense for a specialist short headed line designed for a 7wt rod to weigh 15-17g. Which generally they do. Overweight in an AFTM sense but the correct load for the rod.
I know we started talking about 5wts but the same holds. Based on a 35-40' head, 11-12g would be about right. As the Barrio seems designed for single handed spey line it isn't surprising that it is at the upper end of this range.

I would like to see the AFTM system ditched. A system of head weight in grams makes much more sense . This seems to have taken hold quicker in salmon fishing where head weights in grams are more routinely displayed.
 

PaulD

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The AFTM scale is based upon the gram weight of the first 30ft - minus level tip, my comparison was with the gram weight of the first 33ft of the SLX 5wt and the gram weight of an AFTM 5wt. Rods are categorised by their ability with the first 30ft of line being able to load the rod.
 

silver creek

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I am an experienced caster so no advice needed there. I have the 9’6” Sage X 5w and want to know if loading 6w line will give me a better experience on the large windswept Elan valley reservoirs? I’ve never really loaded one weight up but am curious. Don’t want a 6w rod either as I enjoy the fight my 5w gives me with those small brownies.
If the casting distance is limited because you are casting INTO the wind, then going a line wt up generally helps. The line mass goes up faster than the surface area so the energy in your cast goes up faster than the drag that is holding it back.

If you are using a floating line, you can use an intermediate wt fly line instead. It will float when treated with floatant and it is thinner for the same mass so it will go farther.
 

speytime

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My 2p yes absolutely try over by 1# you can get more feedback through the rod, it's better in windy condition and it'll carry a bigger fly easier if needed, always remember a rods # is only someones opinion your opinion might differ.

The likes of a 40+ expert 42/3ft head around 20g and you can hammer it out with a double hauling and the rod handles it easily, surely if over loading was a thing then everyone with a 40+ would have broken rods.
Just a few nights ago i was using my 7wt with a 17g 35ft head and it's a joy to cast, with a double haul you can effortlessly cast a pair of #4/6/8s 80/90ft.
Yes I know it's not a dry fly but it's horses for courses and the rod will handle a wide range of weights with ease.

Al
 

easker1

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I use a Barrio WF 5 inter on my 5wt it gives me an advantage in the wind here ,but look up lefty Krehs water cast it gives a better loading than an air cast, mind you remember Lefty is the Guy that said that there is more Bulls--- in fly fishing than in a Texas Feed lot , easker1
 

Rob Edmunds

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The short answer is "Yes"

Just put a #6 weight in WF profile through your #5 weight rod....it will make casting easier in almost ever scenario I can think of - especially if you want to punch through the wind, or encounter swirling winds or cross winds..

Any decent floater will do....
 

ohanzee

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You can feel what switching up a weight feels like by casting an extra 6' of line, not much difference at 40' just a bit extra positive feel, but in terms of casting further I'd warn that the extra weight will feel at least as heavier on longer casts, its more a tactic for those casting shorter than the head of line and needing a bit extra weight, not for casting further where you will automatically have the weight.

Casting further is about controlling more line in the air, or shooting further, in a lot of practical situations you don't have 50 or 60' behind you to make a long cast so need to rely on shooting or a combination of both...how much space is a factor I'd want to know, 70' is easy for a 5 weight in an open field but not always possible when fishing.

I'm in the 'do the 70' with the ease of blinking before going further' school.
 

wrongfoot

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My experience is that you'll get more distance than overlining by ditching a floater and using an intermediate or slow sink where possible. You can use bouyant flies to compensate for that. Thinner lines give better line speed and less wind resistance, but using a floater can be better casting downwind with a decent breeze.

This is probably partly compensating for flaws of timing etc.
 
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