Whaaat? How much?

running bear

Well-known member
Points
18
where is Mark Powell to talk about how many Mercs and chalk stream beats his meagre stipend stretches to, and how his greys Gwhatever can winkle his 4 (stocked) fish out between elevenses and afternoon tea.

If you like using an expensive rod, use an expensive rod for whatever pleasure you find in it (wether that’s performance or otherwise), if you don’t, don’t, safe in the knowledge spending a factor of 10 on the rod won’t catch you 10 times as much.

As for fiesta/Range rover assumption, I’d an uncle who drove a 1.6d fiesta van day to day for 20 years, and he was on the rich list. Never assume someone else puts the same value on what you do.
 

ROVER

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
hartlepool
Milwaukee, Snap-On and Fluke are what I use for work. Never buy a cheap multimeter either, I’ve seen the results when testing high voltage systems.
If anyones testing high voltage systems with a multimeter regardless of cost then they shouldn't be allowed to wire a 3pin plug😱😱😱☠☠😉😉
 

sean freeman

Well-known member
Points
28
Location
Manchester
If anyones testing high voltage systems with a multimeter regardless of cost then they shouldn't be allowed to wire a 3pin plug😱😱😱☠☠😉😉
Well high voltage in the train industry (from a live testing competency standpoint) being anything above 230, we do test the capacitance discharge with a multimeter and high rated probes, the raft has been known to store 1000V AC long after the supply has been tripped. It’s enough to seriously harm but below the rating for the Fluke. Wouldn’t test the pantograph or main transformer voltages with one however. I have seen Chinese multimeters blow on household loads though.

They hate us live testing anyway but it’s hard to prove a fault without it sometimes. I have worked with some numpties though that I wouldn’t trust wiring a plug, most ex forces who have qualifications for everything but know very little electrical theory.
 

matt808

Well-known member
Points
28
I've spent way more than I should have on fishing stuff recently but I enjoy using different rods, fishing different rivers etc. My car cost £550, had for 4 months, just serviced it and no problems whatsoever, my last car cost £800 and lasted me 2 years even though I never got it serviced, drove it all over the place. If I'm fairly sure it isn't likely to break down any time soon, I really couldn't give a ****. I'm sure plenty of people complaining of the price of a sage, is it because they're already paying off £200 a month for their car?
 

matt808

Well-known member
Points
28
That's not meant to bash any petrolheads my point is people who spend that money on their cars or other things, it's not necessary, just like buying fishing rods or electronics but if you get the use of out them to justify the price then why not. If you buy a £1000 rod and use it twice then that's a different story. If you use it every week for several years then it justifies paying it.
 

ROVER

Well-known member
Points
48
Location
hartlepool
Well high voltage in the train industry (from a live testing competency standpoint) being anything above 230, we do test the capacitance discharge with a multimeter and high rated probes, the raft has been known to store 1000V AC long after the supply has been tripped. It’s enough to seriously harm but below the rating for the Fluke. Wouldn’t test the pantograph or main transformer voltages with one however. I have seen Chinese multimeters blow on household loads though.

They hate us live testing anyway but it’s hard to prove a fault without it sometimes. I have worked with some numpties though that I wouldn’t trust wiring a plug, most ex forces who have qualifications for everything but know very little electrical theory.
Phew, I thought you meant 'proper' HV!

G
 

ohanzee

Well-known member
Points
83
We should have a 'Cost of Voltage Tester' thread, then Tangled can do some graphs on how mid priced voltage testers are better than expensive ones.
 
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