What a surprise.

3lbgrayling

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Out in a friendly comp today. at our club loch (is they're really such a thing) and mid way during the afternoon I noticed 4 birds approaching .I had a strange feeling these were not Gulls. We are about midway between the river Forth and river Clyde,about 40 miles each way.and I identified them as 4 immature Gannets.WOW.what a sighting heading west to (i hope the Clyde).
Brilliant.

Jim
 
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Your right Jim that is highly unusual. They don't normally like land crossings although they're known to cross over from campeltown loch to macrihanish to miss out the flight round the mull of kintyre. But a crossing from the Forth to Clyde is very unusual. Good spot.
 

codyarrow

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I've seen Gannets fly up Wick river on a couple of occasions. Presume it is food related. Not sure how far they go up.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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A couple flew past me when I was driving across the Queensferry Crossing bridge on Saturday, heading upriver. Unmistakeable shape.

This from back in July, coming over from Orkney...

Orkney2021_1692.jpg


Col
 

codyarrow

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I was driving when it happened so no photo. Two years ago there was a shag walking down the pavement just outside the main street in Golspie. Made me smile.
 

wjg

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Curious. In PEI, cormorants (often detested) are referred to as shags.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Around the Farne Isle they distinguish them by the colour and size, cormorant being a black colour and shag a smaller black bird with a deep green sheen.

I think that is the case throughout the British Isles...

"The great cormorant (P. carbo) and the common shag (G. aristotelis) are the only two species of the family commonly encountered in Britain and Ireland [3] and "cormorant" and "shag" appellations have been later assigned to different species in the family somewhat haphazardly."

P. carbo...

1200px-Phalacrocorax_carbo_Vic.jpg


G. aristotelis...

18567296-ad0c-4edf-8b64-87ada770cf19.jpeg
 

Cap'n Fishy

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The European Cormorant (carbo sinensis) is quite common in England.with small amounts in Scotland.(a tree nesting bird)

Jim

Aye, but would that not be the subspecies of P. carbo, namely P. carbo sinensis? So, technically still the great cormorant, P. carbo?

Wiki could be clearer now that the sinensis subspecies has become more abundant here, right enough.

Col
 

wjg

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Here cormorants are also called Air Force Geese. Airmen, newly arrived on base, would set up blinds to shoot Canada Geese and not know the difference of incoming flocks. (They do crash and burn well. Even better are the lawn darts.)
 

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