what drys for summer on rivers

gerry_tweedie

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Jun 14, 2011
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I have been out the past few nights and havent managed a fish even though they are rising everywhere. I couldnt really tell what they were taking. There were a few upwings about but nothing much on the surface. Any idea what would have caught a fish?
 

kenzler

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Jun 18, 2012
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I'm going size 20 - 22 with a small olive dun pattern or a small f-fly
Hard work at the moment with river levels so low.

Try a longer tippet section as well mate if your not doing this already :thumbs:
 

richardw

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On the banks of the Derbyshire Wye
I have been out the past few nights and havent managed a fish even though they are rising everywhere. I couldnt really tell what they were taking. There were a few upwings about but nothing much on the surface. Any idea what would have caught a fish?

If you cannot see the flies they are eating then try to use the rise forms to determine what they are eating.

Honestly this blog should help you... Dry Fly 'Expert'


richard
 

Mark Morton

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I am just about to try and experiment. So far this season I have fished very successfully with reverse hackled(back to front) flies. The Leckford Professor.
On days with an easterly or nor easterly which flattens our river, I stalked and put flies over known holes and had some very good sport. There wasn't a rise on the river, anywhere. I have now tied a variety of different dries, some well known(Greenwells, F Fly, Iron Blue) and some of my own design, on hooks sizes 16 dry Partridge, through 19 Tiemco 103BL to unknown 20s which I have had for maybe 30yrs. All of the takes I have had so far have been precise, "YES! I'll have that" takes and although the hackle covers the hook point and bend, it does not appear to effect hooking potential. With long whisks/tails which I favour, the flies ride well up on the water. Prospecting and stalking all likely spots, putting two or three well placed flies over them and moving on to the next seems to work for me on my river, when nothing is moving.
 

jada0406

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Hi', The most important upwinged river flies on summer afternoons used to be the blue-winged olive duns, they could hatch in the evening up until dusk (and beyond at times) and their mature spinners, the sherry spinners, provided sport especially after laying their egg cluster, when they ended up, spent, on the water. sherry spinner falls went on into the night; they used to overlap with emerging sedges and with egg-laying females, such as the cinammon sedge, for example.
Greenwell's Glory, Rough Olive or similar dry flies will do as copies of BWO, while Pheasant Tail, Orange or Ginger Quill will copy either male or female Sherry Spinners. A Spent-wing Sherry Spinner will cope when the exhausted females are on the water.
You can copy the sedges with just a couple of patterns. deer Hair Sedge, G and H Sedge or a Roman Moser Balloon Caddis: and you should have a couple of black flies in the box. A plain size 12 0r 14 hackled Black Spider ( with tails) or a black Palmered Sedge are also good after dark.
Where I live, near the Eden and Eamont rivers, olive uprights are providing sport from about 9.30 pm onwards -- something that is new to me on the middle river Eden and lower Eamont. good luck, jadaTC
 
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I have been out the past few nights and havent managed a fish even though they are rising everywhere. I couldnt really tell what they were taking. There were a few upwings about but nothing much on the surface. Any idea what would have caught a fish?

Search for the Red Ant on this website :)

It NeVeR fails!!!
 

micklmass

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Apr 18, 2012
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County Durham
The last 4 wks i have used grey duster and cinnamon sedge, pheasant tail a griffiths gnat in natural & olive with a couple of strands of crystal flash in the tail all have been productive on the wear.
 

cmscotfly_92

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Aug 3, 2012
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Scotland. West side.
1. Olive f-fly size 20/22 (olive/sooty olive body & natural cdc wing)
2. Olive or black cdc para midge size 18/20
3. Elk or deer hair caddis size 14/16 (best combos - black wing, brown cock hackle & burnt orange body...black wing, black cock hackle & sooty olive body...white wing, grizzly cock hackle and lime body...white wing, brown cock hackle and tan body)
4. CDC greenwell's 14/16 (fibet/bristle tails, dark olive/olive biot body, greenwells cock hackle - snipped underneath, upright natural cdc wing)
 

chris_fly

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Blantyre
ive had a bit luck using a team of spiders in black and olive colours when the trout are refusing my dry
 

ant77

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Sealand
Griffith's Gnat size 16 worked well last night after they'd refused s14 Grey Duster. Iron Blues seemed to be the main fodder with sedges later. Rises weren't as frequent as I thought they might have been although there was still some pretty strong sunlight poking through the trees and illuminating my leader up until just short of 8 o'clock. TC - I'm no entomologist (!) but there was also a hatch of QLOs (Quite Large Olives) at pretty much bang on 9.30. I wasn't aware that was unusual, if thats what you meant. I must must must get me a little insect net so I can work out what I'm talking about.
 

jada0406

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Hi', Ant, If you are experiencing what I have been seeing on the Eden system this summer, your QLOs are likely to be Olive Uprights -- either emerging/emerged duns, mainly by day -- or swarming spinners/egg-laying females in the evening.
Olive uprights may emerge at dawn or in the evenings, a little in advance of the day's flights of male spinners from a previous day's hatch. Sometimes you see the latter, without the ladies putting in an appearance, so they can be around for an hour or two, before going back into hiding, no doubt frustrated. :)
If the ladies appear, they will fly up through the hovering males until grasped, literally, and mated. You may then see a steady upstream movement of females, which deposit their eggs in little batches, touching down and moving on. As most larvae are found in riffles, your ladies may/will fly until they find the broken water.
If you see BWO spinners, ladies, after coupling, they will be carrying an egg-ball under the last couple of body segments, held in place by their tail whisks; which is possible mainly, I would suggest, because they have 3 'tails'.
These Sherry Spinners are smaller than Olive Uprights, which are in size some where between LDO and March Brown (which is their nearest relative). Size is all relative in insect identification, which can be very difficult if you have to judge what you see in the air. Behaviour can be helpful.

For example, if you see little bright-winged flies travelling upstream, 'hawking' in flight, back and forth over the water of a riffle, you are probably seeing one of several of the species generally known as ''Olives''. These include Pale Watery, Iron Blue Dun, Small Spurwing and Small Dark Olive (mainly) at this time of year. You might even be seeing under-sized Large Dark Olives without knowing it; but whatever species, if they are of the Family, Baetidae, they will be flying low in order to find a suitable projecting stone in the riffle on which they can land, as they will be crawling down the lee side of the stone in order to lay their little patches of eggs -- maybe only 4 to 5 mm wide by 5 to6 mm long, concave-shaped at the upstream end and convex at the downstream end, as the ladies face the flow, and deposit their eggs in short sweeps of their rear ends, moving forward a fraction between touching rows.
I hope that helps. If you see OU female spinners on the water, a size 14 or 12 Pheasant Tail will move them. After laying their eggs, a spent spinner pattern should move them, or even a standard PH T with the belly whiskers cropped off short, to allow the fly to settle in the surface.
Good luck, and let us know how you get on, including what you see, which is very important.
Now you know why Richard stresses ''observation'' before fishing. jadaTC
 
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diving dipper

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Cornwall
I have been out the past few nights and havent managed a fish even though they are rising everywhere. I couldnt really tell what they were taking. There were a few upwings about but nothing much on the surface. Any idea what would have caught a fish?

I had 2 decent brownies on a local river using a size 16 lunn's particular, that's what's working here.
 

ant77

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Sealand
If the ladies appear, they will fly up through the hovering males until grasped, literally, and mated. You may then see a steady upstream movement of females, which deposit their eggs in little batches, touching down and moving on.

Thanks for your wonderfully comprehensive reply TC. I had no idea that the Olive Upright was a species in its own right (I'd read your original post thinking that you were using generic terms - aren't all Olives 'Upright', or at least, 'Upwinged'?!). But from your reply and a quick butchers at plate II from JG's Trout Fly Recognition, bought recently, there, I think, is the insect I watched. It (she and her sisters?) were moving up and down a couple of feet or more of a vertical trajectory, the bottom boundary of which stood a little above my head (i.e. from about 6'6" to 10' in the air). I didn't notice males perhaps because I was, for a change, transfixed on the lassies. Quite hypnotic. But your post highlights the fact that I.D. is not just about trying to observe the specific colours or the shape or the components etc. but behaviour too (much like butterflies and birdies).

I took up 'fly-fishing' as a challenge and I think the first word in their needs a hell of a lot more attention - not least because there's something about Richard's 'observation' which is all well and good unless you don't actually know what it is that you're trying to look at.

Inspired
Ant
 

eddleston123

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Nov 3, 2012
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Peebles, Scottish Borders
Middle June 10pm - got frustrated - tried everything in my fly box down to a size 20 --Eventually put on a size 12 black CDC hopper - Second cast a cracker of 16 and a half inches, as fat as fat could be!!

Sorry if this post aint too helpful - Just an experience to share!


Douglas


p.s. You cannot beat local knowledge.
 

ferral

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Mar 2, 2011
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Frustrating as hell for me last night, on the river from 8-10pm loads of sedges coming off, but only an occasional slashing rise, assumed they were going for emerging sedges but none of my sedge patterns produced a response. Tied a bunch of different ones and longer leaders de-greased a lot but got nothing. Tried midge patterns too bu no response. I was suprised at how few fish were rising to given the amount of fly life

then just as the spinners stated making their way onto the water I had to go home and the light was fading too much for me to be able to tie a knot anyway.
 

seanr91

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Apr 27, 2013
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Hello mate,

This is my first season Fly Fishing, I checked online for a list of the most popular Dry Flies.

I personally have caught fish on :

Grey Duster - #14
Olive - #14
Adams - #14
Mayfly - #12
Griffiths Gnat - #16

I always add a touch of Gink to make sure they float! Im sure you already know this but I thought i'd give it a mention!

My personal favorite is the Olive Dry Fly, Size 14. I would never leave for fishing without a few of those!

KLINKHAMMERS are a favorite of the guys I fish with as they also use a method called Klink and Dink (Google/YouTube it).


Good luck mate!
 

luke troutstalker

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May 19, 2011
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Cheshire.
The fish on my local stretch refused everything yesterday evening,I had tried all the previously successful patterns.

Went as small as I had - a size 20 green f-fly with a polyprop wing, and was straight into fish. I couldn't keep it afloat in faster water, so I towed a size 16 unweighted hares hear and Mylar ribbed nymph 10" behind a klink, and that also produced.

This dry fly caper is more frustrating than fun, but 90% if that statement is due to my hooky technique. :rolleyes:
 
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