What fly to start with for a newbie?

A. Fluker

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Always under the impression that one of the best flies to learn tyeing with were the spiders but my pal has elected to tie up Diawl Bachs. Roger Woolley always recommended learning winging first as everything else was easier and if one could work with wings then everything else would follow. There should be a bit of fun involved but what would you suggest he start with?

He currently fishes most of the disciplines.
 

cax

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starting to fly tie i would start with the easier patterns and work up, start with nymphs buzzers and the like that are relatively easy to learn. take it one step at a time, one well tied fly is better than ten badly tied ones.
 

arkle

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B & P spider worked quite well for me, both learning & when I teach.
 

K.Cutt

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Always under the impression that one of the best flies to learn tyeing with were the spiders but my pal has elected to tie up Diawl Bachs. Roger Woolley always recommended learning winging first as everything else was easier and if one could work with wings then everything else would follow. There should be a bit of fun involved but what would you suggest he start with?

He currently fishes most of the disciplines.
I would say that regarding spiders they look simple enough but are far harder to get them how they are meant to be.I always find when someone has started on spiders the hackles are too long or overdressed and the threaded body variety are much the same. Having said that the B&P spider is a much easier spider to achieve.
My first fly was a black pennell which too me a while to get right.
I think that doing the basics is a better place to start such as thread work,whip finish,dubbing, hackling and winging etc rather than jumping in to tie a fly straight away.
 

boobies

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I agree that one good fly is worth 10 bad ones. I have always advised my pupils it's best to take an hour to tie a fly that looks good than to tie lots of average ones.

Proportion is king - look at photos or flytying guides for proportions.

If you are not happy, untie the last stage you have done, scrap the material you have just tied in and do it again... then agian if necessary - then move onto the next stage of the fly.

Flytying classes are cerainly worth it as you will see many variations of flytying technique so that you can find the easiest one for you. there is no right or wrong if the end result is a nice looking fly. Please don't say "oh, that will do". Always strive for the best.

Fine tying threads are better (say 14/0 or 8/0 not 6/0). They do snap easier of course, but I work off the basis that two turns of fine thread is better than one with a thick one. Fine thread should also encourage good thread tention and technique.

If you are tying a wetfly similar to a Blae and Black - these proportions should see you right on say a Kamasan B175 or similar:

tail = the length of the shank (from the back of the eye of the hook to opposite the barb)

Body = length of the shank (but leaving roughly the size of the eye of the hook to tie the head of the fly)

rib = starting on the bottom of the hook and finishing on the bottom of the hook (5 turns is considered correct in most cases)

hackle = to a point roughly between the point of the hook and the barb

if winging the fly = in most cases equal roughly to 3/4 the width of the gape in depth (hook shank to the point of the hook) and just short of the length of the tail in length

head of the fly - equal to the length of the eye of the hook

Hope this helps.

Shane
 

AllyFalkirk

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Lures are things I have a certain degree of comfort with. Can be done on slightly bigger hooks, maribou tail and wing, chenille or fritz for the body, you can add a rib in. Not too small and fiddly. Buzzers too can be not too involved and straightforward as you like. Not fished with any of them yet so they may dissolve in the water but haven't caused too much grief in tying!
 

bigtel

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im a newbie flytyer and find spiders very difficult,much better to start with nymphs.get confidence going before moving on.
me im still tying nymphs lol.

terry
 
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