What have you learned from season past!

eddleston123

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Nov 3, 2012
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10,316
Location
Peebles, Scottish Borders
I am referring mainly to brown trout in running waters or reservoirs.
Here's what I take from past season.

1. Low water should not deter you. Trout have always got to feed at sometime off the day.

2. Smaller flies are part of the answer. Referring mainly to dry flies.

3. Weighted nymphs have been very effective early morning (running waters).

4. When fishing reservoirs (July onwards) a tungsten weighted nymph (counted down and slow retrieve) has been very effective - Trad wet flies have been in the main a waste of time.

5. When dry fly fishing on shrunken streams a small (size 16/18) emerger or semi sunk dry fly of some type has been far more effective than a bigger high riding dry fly.

6. This one is something that you can't really define - When you wake up in the morning and check the weather forecast to make your decision whether or not it is worthwhile going fishing - JUST GO!!! Some of the bad looking days have turned out to been the best.

7. In slow clear shrunken waters, when a fish rises to your fly - do not be too quick to strike - In my opinion these fish are lethargic and their body movements are subsequently SLOW. Too quick a lift equates to striking into fresh air!

8. From a trout's welfare point of view - Barbless hooks is an absolute essential - Get them in quick, photo and release in the streamy part of the water.

9.Please remember, should another angler present themselves within 25 yards of you, saying - Is it alright if I jump in here mate - Tell them to Fuc#k off.

10. Finally, if you want a peaceful days fishing avoid conversation with other anglers - they are usually slavering arseholes who want to tell you the biggest porkies ever. It is even worse when they announce that they are a 'Guide' Better to just immediately leave the water or alternatively, slit your wrists!!

Stillwater anglers or any other disciplines, please feel free to contribute
Your views will be very much appreciated.



Douglas
 
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Whinging pom

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Jun 10, 2021
Messages
832
Location
Northants
Accept that everything is rusty early season. The Lunkers will hit you when you least expect it.

If the thought of losing a fly in an overhanging bramble puts you off making the cast or leaves you in a bad mood when you lose one, then you've invested too much time or too much money in the fly
.
So much happens in that first hour after it's too dark to tie flies on.. For the sake of the fish and unhooking quickly have a head torch just in case!

When you've given up on a drift and start thinking where to work next and everything has gone a bit slack . That's when a fish will come up a snatch at your fly.... and you'll miss it. Stay Alert!

There are no real failures, there are just results, some results you like and some results you learn from!
( if you don't learn.... Then its a failure).
 

skajtrout

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Joined
Jan 12, 2015
Messages
1,137
Keep a spare corkscrew in your rucksack for the day when you realise that you’ve left your Swiss Army knife at home and you can’t sodding well open the Gevrey Chambertin 2005 that you’d kept for opening day.

I know, first world problems…

Skaj
 

jaybeegee

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Joined
Sep 25, 2017
Messages
2,243
Location
Yorkshire
1. Canoeists are deaf.
2. ‘ I only fish dry fly actually ‘, really means ‘ that’s all I can do’.
3. Wading is dangerous.
4. Your wife is not an ***** and knows the difference between Sage and Maxcatch.
5. A fishing diary is proof of deteriorating reflexes, eyesight and stamina.
6. You need a sense of humour.
7. Your wife is not an ***** and knows if you smell of beer.
8. Cattle are attracted to carbon fibre.
9. Fish are repelled by carbon fibre.
10. Your wife is not an ***** so you’re doing something right…🙂
B
Erm… the missing word is idi0t.
 

shropshire_lad

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Joined
May 31, 2017
Messages
3,382
Location
Too far away from the wild places!
To answer the OP, that I need to make the effort to go fishing in 2022.

That should hopefully be easier. Covid restrictions, official and unofficial are easing. Likewise, family pressures (elderly relatives) are also easing. Unfortunately, I'm still just as far away from the places I want to go (Wales, Scotland) but I've just got to make the effort.
 

BobP

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Joined
Oct 28, 2007
Messages
9,600
Location
Wiltshire
Speaking as a fly fishing guide, on my days off when I go fishing for myself I avoid other anglers like the plague. I get enough pressure on work days without getting others coming along and asking for help, flies or advice when I'm doing my own thing.
 

PaulF1

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Joined
Aug 11, 2021
Messages
72
Location
Manchester UK
I don't really know what I am doing yet.
I can't catch trout bigger than about 6" from the Ribble.
I'm not overly concerned.


(6" might be a fisherman's tale.)
 

running bear

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Joined
Oct 23, 2009
Messages
675
Location
North County Dublin
New lessons
Maxcatch eco's are a decent line

Never assume a small rise in an unlikey spot is a tiddler...i got a lunker 12" from the bank in 6" of water in the bright midday sun, i only cast to it for casting practice.

Re-enforced lessons.
Clean your flyline, often
No fly is too small, definitely true for trout and salmon.
For pike, a well fished mobile mid size fly beats a poorly fished 12" chicken, most of the time.
I still dont enjoy euronymph styles.
Early and late reaps rewards
 

beetlebum

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Joined
May 20, 2011
Messages
440
Location
Chorley
I've learnt that you should always go fishing if you get the opportunity, even if the weather is less than favourable. I'm glad I got out early season as not only did it result in a P.B but since our son arrived I haven't had chance to go since.
 

b13rux

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Joined
Jun 24, 2020
Messages
136
id agree with most of the OP's points, but can really relate to number 6. I've made more of an effort to fish all conditions this season and its paid off. Fish when you can.
 

t44

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Apr 11, 2010
Messages
91
If you get broken check the tippet….don’t let it happen 3 times before you realise you’ve bought a bad batch!
 

Elwyman

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May 18, 2006
Messages
866
Location
North Wales
I rediscovered the usefulness of fast intermediate lines like the Cortland Blue on stillwaters, and I caught a salmon on one too.
 

diawl bach

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Joined
May 17, 2006
Messages
9,178
Finally twigged how to use the small nail knot tool on my snips without consulting a diagram, also learned how to tie a bowline which proved to be a handy knot for boats.

Started using Aquel as a floatant along with the phrase " Aquel heure est la poisson arriver"

Gave Middy Lo Viz a thorough work-out and liked it as a tippet in 3.3lbs for small dries and 4.4lb for hoppers/sedges.

Continued to leave dries on the surface for extended lengths of time, this season applied that practice to smaller patterns - it's surprising how long a fish can can take to make a move, saves a lot of unnecessary disturbance arising from continual casting.
 

JohnH

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Joined
May 18, 2006
Messages
4,610
Location
Near Southampton
Simply confirmed what I knew, that the weather can kn*ck*r the best laid plans. April and most of May in the South were dreadful. But there's always next year...
 

Sash

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Joined
Aug 30, 2006
Messages
447
Location
London & SW Wales
id agree with most of the OP's points, but can really relate to number 6. I've made more of an effort to fish all conditions this season and its paid off. Fish when you can.
+1
And I would go further, and say fish much lighter than you would think normal in low water conditions.

I have started using a 10ft 3-weight rod for sewin at night in low water: this lovely fresh fish took a small Muddler well after dark in a pool that resembled a puddle. The river was at its all-time low, having had no rain for over two months, and if I had used my normal 7-weight, I firmly believe that the line would have scared the fish off.

I looked at the river level before setting out that evening, and very nearly gave up - what a mistake that would have been!
FB4CC19A-59F5-4F4D-9995-3817641826D7.jpeg
 

Mr Notherone

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Joined
Jul 19, 2013
Messages
4,543
Location
Monmouthshire
Like others, I don't have the luxury of fishing only when conditions are good. I have to fish when I can - sometime that is in poor weather or conditions and sometimes it means not staying as late as I'd like when I know more fish will feed liberally.

Over the years I've learned that fish will always feed and it's just a matter of finding them and figuring out on what. It's usually possible to catch a fish, perhaps not many. It can be more rewarding finding one fish on a quiet day than catching dozens when every fish in the river seems to be feeding.
 

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