What Is The Best Colour For Oars?

bobmiddlepoint

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Years ago when we were having another boat built to stick on Loch Langavat, the subject of pins or rowlocks came up at the committee meeting.
Much discussion ensued until an ex Lomond fisher piped up "Pins, oars for idiots". That ended the discussion. I do not like pins because it can make trimming the boat difficult as I cannot move sideways to compensate for awareness challenged anglers.

That is true but I used to use my two border collies for trimming the boat!
At least with pins you can let go of the oars knowing that they will still be there when you go back to them. Even in the lumpiest water it is sensible to be out in an oar won't jump off a pin. The only time I ever had an unattended oar come off a pin was when a border collie stood up under it and lifted it off... actually it happened more than once!

Having to sit nearly on the gunwale to keep the boat half level when the rods are fishing is a pain but comes under the "looking after the customer" bit. When the twowts insist on keeping the boat half capsized while you try to row or motor back upwind is a different matter and isn't to be tolerated! I don't like boat seats for that very reason but you have to accept that old bu99ers can't fish without them!


Andy
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Definite rebrand required, this idea of guides is an 'orrible Americanism what we don't need here!

Andy

I don't even know if that ('guide') is what he calls himself or thinks of himself as being. It's more what I and others think of him as. He's different from the usual definition of a ghillie - I reckon, anyway. So, what else to call him if we avoid Americanisms - and I am no fan of Americanisms. 😜

I know another couple of 'guides' with their own businesses, and have done some photography work for them both and have fished with them both. They are honest, hard-working, skilled, knowledgeable people. Again, ghillie is not the correct term for them*, but if not, 'guide', then what?

*I don't know any ghillies who have been asked to provide prostitutes for visiting Russian VIPs! 😜
 
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Cap'n Fishy

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Having to sit nearly on the gunwale to keep the boat half level when the rods are fishing is a pain but comes under the "looking after the customer" bit. When the twowts insist on keeping the boat half capsized while you try to row or motor back upwind is a different matter and isn't to be tolerated! I don't like boat seats for that very reason but you have to accept that old bu99ers can't fish without them!

Andy

It's nice to know the customer is held in such high regard... 😜

I know several highly skilled and highly experienced anglers who take a ghillie just to have the company (as their wives don't fish). Often the ghillie is invited to fish with them. I doubt their ghillies look down on them.
 

easker1

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I have used both pins and Rowlocks I can cope with both but I prefer pins, trimming the boat is easy by saying" trim the boat, please",I agreee with Dingbat about the discussion business b but , it happens, the loch I worked on had various beats and each boat worked a beat each day in succession, but some of the guests wanted a beat to suit them, but the system was cast in bronze and had been for generations, but guests would throw hissy fits, but we had our beat list and had to stick to it, as for come in if you're tough enough, try running before a sea at Rhu Rhe My sounder was showing 15ft seas in my 16ft boat( My oars then were only varnished) easker1
 

codyarrow

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I'm leaning towards green oars with white tips although I might do one pink pair.


Andy

From my experience of Highland estates here is how this conundrum will be solved.

Andy enters the estate office -'I've decided to paint the oars green and need 12 quid to buy some green gloss from Thurso'

Factor - 'Bollox, use the blue gloss from the store that we painted all the estate windows with'. (y)
 
D

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Rowlocks... awful.. bin!

Pin... all the way. (y)

100% agree.

Apart from all round better functionality pins provide, they're certainly much quieter to use than rowlocks.

I have an 8 inch piece of 4mm thick leather glued to my oars, which not only deadens the noise, but protects both the oars and gunwales from wear.
 

sage5

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100% agree.

Apart from all round better functionality pins provide, they're certainly much quieter to use than rowlocks.

I have an 8 inch piece of 4mm thick leather glued to my oars, which not only deadens the noise, but protects both the oars and gunwales from wear.
All oars at one time had leather round them, where they sat in the Rowlocks, tacked on with small copper tacks
 

Cap'n Fishy

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100% agree.

Apart from all round better functionality pins provide, they're certainly much quieter to use than rowlocks.

I have an 8 inch piece of 4mm thick leather glued to my oars, which not only deadens the noise, but protects both the oars and gunwales from wear.

Some of our oars have an articulated ferrule attached to the oar. This slips over the thole pin and rests on the base of the pin. So the oar makes no contact with the gunwale.

Col
 

Cap'n Fishy

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Here's the same sort of idea on a Coulam...

coulamthole-1.jpg


That's actually a better system, as the pin is part of the oar, so the boat only has a socket hole. This means there is no thole pin sticking up that you need to be aware of, getting in and out of the boat... "They don't like it up 'em, Captain Mainwaring!" o_O Also means there is no chance of damaging the pin when you turn the boat over to give the hull a scrub.
 
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Cap'n Fishy

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Here is the Sweeney design - which the Lake of Menteith boats have...

Menteith25Mar17_0459.jpg


2015-08-30-17.27.jpg


The pin is on the gunwale, and the sleeve is on the oar.
 

Cap'n Fishy

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The Frandy boats are a different design, but the oars are along the same lines as the Menteith boats - a pin on a metal plate on the gunwale, and an articulated sleeve on the oar that slips over the pin, so the oar doesn't touch the gunwale...

Frandy31May14_6344.jpg


Frandy13Jul13_4478.jpg
 
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Cap'n Fishy

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The old Loch Leven boats had two pins that functioned as a primitive rowlock - you just lay the oar in between the pins...

Leven30Sep12_6187.jpg


The oars had rope bound round them to stop the wood getting damaged...

7768.jpg
 
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easker1

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I use inner tubes for wrapping the oars I get a heavy duty inner tube from the local Garage , I cut it in to 2 in wide strips and wrap it spirally round the appropriate section pinned with Copper tacks at each end, with a rope grommet as a stopper , works well cheap and efficient, easker1
 

4wings

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I have been in a boat where one oar went Awol, it was surprisingly difficult to see in the water as it lay between wavelets, perhaps a Dayglo colour would be an advantage?
 

light olive

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But we all know that isn't true!
It is true. And to be honest, ....you're a **** Ghillie😁. Now your telling us on some other thread that you do not appreciate Scottish people visiting other parts of thier own country. Do me a favour and fuuk off back to where you came.
 
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