When the fly lands.

GEK79

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Hello all a question if I may.. When fishing today and seeing whats going on if I spot some fly life on the lough and have something similar in the box..
When I cast the fly what should be next a gentle twitch once? A slow retrieve lift and recast .
Now it's wet here today with a moderate northerly wind.. So not sure if there will be much action in top..
Just something I've always wondered..
Thanks for advice
Gary.
 

bignedkelly

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Whatever way the fish want it - there's no one retrieve that will suit all eventualities - you will no doubt have your favorite types of retrieve and this as good a place to start as any but if the fish dont want that on a particular day then its up to you to change up your retrieve and see if you can figure what they do want.
 

GEK79

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Whatever way the fish want it - there's no one retrieve that will suit all eventualities - you will no doubt have your favorite types of retrieve and this as good a place to start as any but if the fish dont want that on a particular day then its up to you to change up your retrieve and see if you can figure what they do want.
That's why I've asked as during the dry fly now I struggle with what I should and shouldn't do.. So I believe what I'm doing is wrong. Hence the question..
 

campsiefisher

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If we are talking stillwaters, I prefer to cast and leave the fly static, and let the breeze do the work (ie: bob the fly around or move gently up and down).

If i get no offers that way, it could be the silhouette is wrong or the fish sees something that's not right, but what i will try before changing, is to put my finger at a distance of one inch (25mm) from the fly line and tap it gently quickly twice, like you would tapping gently in quick succession on a keyboard key.

This action is usually just enough to give the fly a small quick movement, and I like to think it may be taken by a fish for a movement similar to a fly moving it's wings in readiness to take off, this sometimes induces the fish to take.

Best regards
Jim
 

GEK79

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Thanks J
If we are talking stillwaters, I prefer to cast and leave the fly static, and let the breeze do the work (ie: bob the fly around or move gently up and down).

If i get no offers that way, it could be the silhouette is wrong or the fish sees something that's not right, but what i will try before changing, is to put my finger at a distance of one inch (25mm) from the fly line and tap it gently quickly twice, like you would tapping gently in quick succession on a keyboard key.

This action is usually just enough to give the fly a small quick movement, and I like to think it may be taken by a fish for a movement similar to a fly moving it's wings in readiness to take off, this sometimes induces the fish to take.

Best regards
Jim
Thanks Jim jm dropping down to the hidden lough and will see what's happening. Thanks you
Gary
 

ohanzee

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I think this is a really good question, and I'm with Campsiefisher, static until that didn't work.

Posted before but I once happened upon a tiny loch with steep sides, you are looking almost down into the water, and can see trout, it shocked me to see the fish reactions, nothing was spooked by the line landing, in most cases this was what made trout come to the fly, and they knew exactly where it was without being to see it, they came from a fair distance away to the sound.
What shocked me was how spooked they were by even the tiniest movement, they didn't trust the fly and it put nearly every one off, lifting the line off the water cleared them completely.

This changed my way of doing things and now aim to just not do anything to put them off with a dry, rather than do things to make them take, if that makes sense, with a nymph I think the opposite.

I think it's a really crucial bit, they say 10% of fishers catch 90% of the fish, I reckon it's in these tiny decisions that makes the difference.
 
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Mr Notherone

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It’s a myth that anglers have patience. The best have very little. Best to keep experimenting. Mix things up, keep the dry still, twitch it to induce a take, slow retrieve, change the pattern. I’m a firm believer that if something isn’t working and you don’t make a change - the best you can hope for the is more if the same.
 

glas y dorlan

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When fishing dries, as soon as the fly or flies land on the water I like to gently straighten out the leader and then let the wind or drift do it’s bit. After that, no fixed list or time before next cast.
 
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Dead drift with the wind and/or the current. Like any other dead insect behaves on the surface. It's only logical to begin with the most natural way, if that doesn't work, the angler or a tight line can work the fly. But aim for the longest possible dead drift, Gary, on all types of water. Dead flies don't skate, they drift.
 

Rhithrogena

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+1 for static. My favourite tactic with dries is to cast out across the wind and move down the bank as they drift across in front, maintaining contact by slowly figure of eight retrieving the slack. This avoids a big bow in the line which accelerates the drift of the flies unnaturally (this bow in the line can be a good thing with wet flies/buzzers, mind).
When the flies are just a rod length or so out I lift off and recast.
When I have fished a section of bank I either walk back upwind and start again or move.
 

dgp

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Wales.
It’s a myth that anglers have patience. The best have very little. Best to keep experimenting. Mix things up, keep the dry still, twitch it to induce a take, slow retrieve, change the pattern. I’m a firm believer that if something isn’t working and you don’t make a change - the best you can hope for the is more if the same.
Agree ! If you do what you've always done you'll get what you've always got !
 

GEK79

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Hello all a question if I may.. When fishing today and seeing whats going on if I spot some fly life on the lough and have something similar in the box..
When I cast the fly what should be next a gentle twitch once? A slow retrieve lift and recast .
Now it's wet here today with a moderate northerly wind.. So not sure if there will be much action in top..
Just something I've always wondered..
Thanks for advice
Gary.
So drifting spinners over trout feeding on them didn't work.. Casting to rising fish feeding on spent spinners didn't work.. All went quiet something was hatching under the surface so 4 takes on the bibio non landed. Packed up went to other lough 2 landed matching the hatch of midges.. Great day.. Thabks all..
Gary
 

Paul_B

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I tend to retrieve when the fly drops, just enough to straighten the tippet, wait a few minuets then a gentle intermittent retrieve to add a bit of movement, if it sinks a slow retrieve to keep it near the surface with a slightly faster retrieve every now and then, this usually gets their attention.
 

Tangled

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Static, but with some large exceptions.

Fish will often take a fly deliberately dragged across the surface causing a wake. I've caught several fish slowly retrieving a dry daddy when statics were ignored. Muddlers were designed for wake fishing. Bob-flies on a team of three wets is another. Dabbling another. Sedges are often fished with a wake, possibly mimicking the fly trying to take off from the lake. I've accidentally caught fish retrieving a dry mayfly.

There are no definitive statements in fishing. Except that one. :)
 

Paul_B

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I tend to retrieve when the fly drops, just enough to straighten the tippet, wait a few minuets then a gentle intermittent retrieve to add a bit of movement, if it sinks a slow retrieve to keep it near the surface with a slightly faster retrieve every now and then, this usually gets their attention.

You'll have to make your own minds up on how many minutes each minuet lasts :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO:
blooby spill cheque
 

tenet

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Oct 24, 2007
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I mostly fish dries from a drifting boat and fan the water leaving the flies for a relatively short time before recasting. Should a fish come to the fly but not take then a slight twitch sometimes induces the take. A tip I read about was to apply Gink to the fly using your little finger thereby not accidently getting floatant on the leader.
Re scaring fish - a tactic when using the booby or whatever on a washing line rig is to cast and give a good draw causing the booby to make a disturbance on the water prior to twiddling the flies back. The initial disturbance sometimes gets the attention of fish cruising below the surface.
 
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