When you poach a club water and discover that the club chair is a professional cameraman...

wobbly face

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Verbally abusive, threats of physical violence, trespassing (no actual assault so no aggravated trespass which would be a Police response). The Angling Trust fought hard to get "Theft Of Fishing rights" Home Office code 116/11 which means the Police should deal with it. Never mind about hard times due to Corvid 19. They also broke "Lock Down". I wonder if their car was legal? You've done a lot work for the Police with video footage and car reg.
 

glueman

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Verbally abusive, threats of physical violence, trespassing (no actual assault so no aggravated trespass which would be a Police response). The Angling Trust fought hard to get "Theft Of Fishing rights" Home Office code 116/11 which means the Police should deal with it. Never mind about hard times due to Corvid 19. They also broke "Lock Down". I wonder if their car was legal? You've done a lot work for the Police with video footage and car reg.
Probably locals that fishery is not the easiest to find
 

eddleston123

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The problem as I see it , is simply a lack of meaningful penalty for crime nowadays.

Years ago as a teenager, it was not unusual to get a hard kick up the arse from the local bobby, or even a clip around the year. I know that this sounds out of date 'when I was lad' type of stuff, but the yob of today, knows full well that they can carry out crime and anti social behaviour with impunity.

Many warnings are issued and penalties are watered down to the extent that the yob simply can stick up two fingers to the authorities, and treat any weak penalties as a 'badge of honour'

Now, if the public were to get involved with any type of measured rough justice, then they would be the ones in the dock.

We now live in a mamby pamby cotton wool, snowflake society were this is allowed to happen. How this started in the first place, is anyone's guess. Perhaps the subject of a new thread!



Douglas
 
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glueman

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The problem as I see it nowadays, is simply a lack of meaningful penalty for crime nowadays.

Years ago as a teenager, it was not unusual to get a hard kick up the arse from the local bobby, or even a clip around the year. I know that this sounds out of date 'when I was lad' type of stuff, but the yob of today, knows full well that they can carry out crime and anti social behaviour with impunity.

Many warnings are issued and penalties are watered down to the extent that the yob simply can stick up two fingers to the authorities, and treat any weak penalties as a 'badge of honour'

Now, if the public were to get involved with any type of measured rough justice, then they would be the ones in the dock.

We now live in a mamby pamby cotton wool, snowflake society were this is allowed to happen. How this started in the first place, is anyone's guess. Perhaps the subject of a new thread!



Douglas
When corporal punishment was stopped at schools at the behest of the teachers unions and teachers themselves. If I came home from school saying I had been smacked or canned my mother would belt me and when dad came home from work i would get another. Now if the teacher razes a hand to a child the force of law arrives in the form of ambulance chasing lawyers
 

speytime

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I believe the belt at school learned you there's that there's consequences for your actions.
Ime if you got the belt you deserved it.
Whoever got that banned done society no favours.

Al
 

glueman

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I believe the belt at school learned you there's that there's consequences for your actions.
Ime if you got the belt you deserved it.
Whoever got that banned done society no favours.

Al
In state-run schools, and in private schools where at least part of the funding came from government, corporal punishment was outlawed by the British Parliament in 1986, following a 1982 ruling by the European Court of Human Rights that such punishment could not be administered without parental consent, and that a child's "right to education" could not be infringed by suspending children who, with parental approval, refused to submit to corporal punishment.[175][176] In other private schools, it was banned in 1998 (England and Wales), 2000 (Scotland) and 2003 (Northern Ireland).[177]

The government in power were the Tories under Maggy
 

streams

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My youngest boy was being bullied in secondary school I went round to have a word one of the wee dearhearts got in my face raised his hand to punch me I pushed him away the other kids around were all shouting "let him hit you meaning me hit him,you will get a claim" I was asked by a teacher to come inside while I'm there some teacher was phoning the cops to report me for an assault,any how I'm discussing this bullying with another teacher and part his conversation was "we can do nothing when the little dearhearts play up the first thing they say leave me alone I've got rights" so God help future generations
 

wjg

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Once bought a house in a modest neighbourhood that came with 2 little shysters "terrorizing" the locals on their bicycles. Foul mouths, no respect, riding thru flower beds, etc. Grabbed one off the bike, by the throat, and told him we could be friends or not! That evening a single father shows up at my door with the kids in tow for a group apology. He didn't know what entitled richardheads they had become until they complained to him about me.
 

airsprite

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Mike Tyson once said " Everyone has a plan till they get punched in the mouth "
Eventually these sorts try it on with the wrong person and receive a lesson they won't forget.
I avoid confrontation if i can, but we all know chaps that would snap pretty quickly if spoken to in such a manner.

Steve
 

speytime

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Al
You would't be saying that if like me you had a primary school headmaster who hated your family, the canings i took for jack s**t untill i was 11, well i'll leave it at that.
I know what low trash some teachers can be, make no mistake, a teacher burst my ear drum at primary school for the heinous act of eating in class, the bitch "Miss Samson married to Bannister around 1978 that worked in East calder primary" snuck up behind and slapped me on the side of the head driving the air in the ear through my ear drum.
I could go on and bore you with other underhanded stuff seen over the years but I won't.
FYI the headmaster at the high school disliked 2 of my older brothers, me and another brother paid because of that.

When my sons went to East calder primary I dreaded meeting "Mrs Bannister/Samson" i had fully intended to warn her there would be grave consequences should she think about lifting her hand to either of my sons, thankfully she'd left.

Al
 
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Tailing Loop

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In state-run schools, and in private schools where at least part of the funding came from government, corporal punishment was outlawed by the British Parliament in 1986, following a 1982 ruling by the European Court of Human Rights that such punishment could not be administered without parental consent, and that a child's "right to education" could not be infringed by suspending children who, with parental approval, refused to submit to corporal punishment.[175][176] In other private schools, it was banned in 1998 (England and Wales), 2000 (Scotland) and 2003 (Northern Ireland).[177]

The government in power were the Tories under Maggy
But with their hands tied by Brussells. The Isle of Man had the birch on the statute book up until Brussells issued the C of HR nonsense. Until then there was NO graffitti anywhere on the island, it was noticiceable the following year, the bus shelters and places were daubed with graffitti... the deterrent had been removed, so the yobs took advantage.
 

flyfisher222

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But with their hands tied by Brussells. The Isle of Man had the birch on the statute book up until Brussells issued the C of HR nonsense. Until then there was NO graffitti anywhere on the island, it was noticiceable the following year, the bus shelters and places were daubed with graffitti... the deterrent had been removed, so the yobs took advantage.
Nothing to do with Brussels.

The Isle of Man is not in the EU nor in the UK.
 

glueman

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But with their hands tied by Brussells. The Isle of Man had the birch on the statute book up until Brussells issued the C of HR nonsense. Until then there was NO graffitti anywhere on the island, it was noticiceable the following year, the bus shelters and places were daubed with graffitti... the deterrent had been removed, so the yobs took advantage.
So why is there graffiti in small rural villages in the UK but none in the same in continental Europe. It is the same with litter France is clean, Germany is spotless so are the scandinavian countries is it something to do with the British mentality
 

Tailing Loop

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Nothing to do with Brussels.

The Isle of Man is not in the EU nor in the UK.
It isn't, but they were still obliged to remove the birch from the statue. It hadn't been used for 30 or more years, but it was still acting as a deterrent. I don't profess to now the legal reasons or the political ones, all I know is that the reason was because corporate punishment was no longer seen as permissible, and that came from the Human Rights lot. The Isle of Man Government (Tynwald) don't usually capitulate just for the sake of it. They are quite prepared to make their own minds up, but on this one I remember the arguments that ensued. It wasn't taken off without a fight.
 

flyfisher222

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It isn't, but they were still obliged to remove the birch from the statue. It hadn't been used for 30 or more years, but it was still acting as a deterrent. I don't profess to now the legal reasons or the political ones, all I know is that the reason was because corporate punishment was no longer seen as permissible, and that came from the Human Rights lot. The Isle of Man Government (Tynwald) don't usually capitulate just for the sake of it. They are quite prepared to make their own minds up, but on this one I remember the arguments that ensued. It wasn't taken off without a fight.
Maybe from the European Court of Human Rights. That isn't an EU outfit either. Though most European countries (47 as opposed to the EU's 28, now 27) have each, as independent nations, signed up to it.

A shame. I'm not one or these "Put 'em in the army" blokes but we are far too weak on this sort of stuff.
 

glueman

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Maybe from the European Court of Human Rights. That isn't an EU outfit either. Though most European countries (47 as opposed to the EU's 28, now 27) have each, as independent nations, signed up to it.

A shame. I'm not one or these "Put 'em in the army" blokes but we are far too weak on this sort of stuff.
flyfisher 222 you have forgotten that if the average Brit sees European before or after any other words it is the EU
 

davidms

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So why is there graffiti in small rural villages in the UK but none in the same in continental Europe. It is the same with litter France is clean, Germany is spotless so are the scandinavian countries is it something to do with the British mentality
Ever been to that loveliest of countries, Portugal? Shocking amounts of
tagging and bad graffiti on lovely old buildings in Lisbon and Porto. But I think it will go as the cities are gentrified.
 
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