Where would you rather be

whitehorses

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5degrees celcius, scrawly winds ,raining ,possible hail or snow showers dark and dreary
where else would you rather be
 
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jaybeegee

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5degrees celcius, scrawly winds ,raining ,possible hail or snow showers dark and dreary
where else would you rather be
Well, this spot in Northern Goa springs to mind…right time of year too.

4C0BCFB5-879F-4137-9530-592F3BF6EF98.jpeg
 

ohanzee

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This is what it looks like when I go to work.......

k.jpg


And this is what it looks like when I get back......

k.jpg


and this is in between.....

16815712.jpg


So pretty much anywhere that has daylight and more than 2% sun really.
 

whitehorses

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Did anyone check to make sure that was an angler and not a desperate migrant trying to get in? ;)
definetly an angler trying to escape me id say lol
This is what it looks like when I go to work.......

View attachment 46124

And this is what it looks like when I get back......

View attachment 46125

and this is in between.....
i think he has seen the light ,he just phoned me to collect him ,he,s very words were" im f**king freezing get me out of here "yes as ye probally guessed i didnt bother getting in the boat so left him (my son )to his own devices ,he only lasted 4 hrs tops ,they dont make them like they used too
still though it was 4 hrs more than me ,whos a crabit lad then
 

diawl bach

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Well, this spot in Northern Goa springs to mind…right time of year too.

View attachment 46119
If that's Baga Creek, north Goa I spent Christmas there in 1976 before heading a little further north to Vagator Beach, 3 months altogether. The bus stopped on the south of the creek, we were on the north, you had to wade across holding your shopping over your head.
 

jaybeegee

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It’s Ashwem, a bit further up than Baga and Vagator, across the Chapora River at Morjim. If you crossed the main river when you were there you’ve probably been ….you old hippy. 😁
 

diawl bach

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I used to walk up to the Chapora and watch the dhows setting off for the open sea, it was very calm, timeless, no one around. I carried a snorkel and mask all the way from the UK to do some swimming there, it was good for a laugh in Afghanistan, most people had no idea what it was for.

Having seen a few photos of latter day Baga I'll give it a miss, north of the river looks much quieter now. I do plan to get back, always intended to visit Kashmir to fish for trout but it's become a war zone so that looks increasingly unlikely.
 

ohanzee

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I used to walk up to the Chapora and watch the dhows setting off for the open sea, it was very calm, timeless, no one around. I carried a snorkel and mask all the way from the UK to do some swimming there, it was good for a laugh in Afghanistan, most people had no idea what it was for.

Having seen a few photos of latter day Baga I'll give it a miss, north of the river looks much quieter now. I do plan to get back, always intended to visit Kashmir to fish for trout but it's become a war zone so that looks increasingly unlikely.

I googled 'is Kashmir dangerous...''Because of the risks of civil disorder and acts of terrorism in many districts of Jammu and Kashmir, the state has a high security threat level and is considered dangerous for travelers. Sometimes violent clashes break out between militants and Indian security forces. The number of rapes are quickly growing, with assaults taking place at tourist destinations and other locations. Kashmir is one of most densely militarized places on earth, with more than 500,000 Indian troops estimated to be deployed to counter any incidents.
The substantial military presence in Kashmir may be unnerving for tourists. Plus, repetitive shutdowns and curfews are disruptive''.

And thought..waking up in darkness to go to a meeting about something I can't remember to lose another day of my quickly reducing lifespan.....or that? and think maybe a bit of that.
 

Hardrar

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Sigh, not anytime soon reading the news, you cannot buy cancellation insurance now either , so that pretty much kills all international travel off again!

Here- 7 mile beach Jamaica - our second home normally
ED67638C-993B-4249-833E-B05C11556239.jpeg

Rush hour, every hour is cocktail hour!
7259FBCA-940F-408B-A4C6-C2C97A36BBFD.jpeg

AC1DC9A3-C072-4E40-9C95-29D39D7211B6.jpeg


Or here as a close second at Christmas, great Atmosphere

10A908DE-CA48-4735-8E57-7916326BD885.jpeg

FFD79365-AC36-41D1-902F-D4F3E55CFC44.jpeg
 

Whinging pom

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I googled 'is Kashmir dangerous...''Because of the risks of civil disorder and acts of terrorism in many districts of Jammu and Kashmir, the state has a high security threat level and is considered dangerous for travelers. Sometimes violent clashes break out between militants and Indian security forces. The number of rapes are quickly growing, with assaults taking place at tourist destinations and other locations. Kashmir is one of most densely militarized places on earth, with more than 500,000 Indian troops estimated to be deployed to counter any incidents.
The substantial military presence in Kashmir may be unnerving for tourists. Plus, repetitive shutdowns and curfews are disruptive''.

And thought..waking up in darkness to go to a meeting about something I can't remember to lose another day of my quickly reducing lifespan.....or that? and think maybe a bit of that.
I spent what was supposed to have been a few days in Shrinigar on a beautiful big old house boat, we were stuck there for two weeks as the Indian army had closed the airport. We eventually had to ‘escape’ in a cab over a high mountain pass . The locals were great and are desperate for tourists for thier boats ( made and used by the British colonials when they used to come and escape from the heat of the Indian plains)..
The problem is the Indian army and it’s informers. They were the only threat I felt, the local Kashmiris were so open and generous and did everything they could to protect us.
The bazaars were fabulous , as were the the old Mughal gardens and palaces, the scenery and mountains are awesome, and make you realise that it would be an impossible place to subdue the determined Kashmiris, hence the Indians are still trying and failing so many years after partition.

The family I stayed with used to take people up into the mountains fly fishing , but the Indian army smashed all their gear and do everything they can to make visitors unwelcome and kill the tourism and keep the population pegged down.
it’s really not a happy to place to visit despite being one of the most spectacular Himalayan kingdoms, we were constantly being observed, and ushered away from dangerous encounters and I saw about a dozen corpses of poor Kashmiris that didn’t make it, and was guided away from two ‘incidents’ on Army posts, one ended in an exchange of gun fire and the other a grenade attack.
it really made me rethink what we term as terrorists, local teenage boys have no options and either escape to Indian cities to hussle arround the bazaars where they are treated as scum or are stuck in the valley watching the oppression and killing of they’re fellow Kashmiris by the Indian army.
I’m sure as a rebellious teenager I’d have probably wanted to make it as difficult as possible for the Indians too! They just want their land and life back.
Yet another stuff up of the British colonial policies and meddling I’m afraid. It’s such a shame it’s a beautiful place and beautiful people.( and I imagine the trout haven’t been bothered by a fly for many years).
 

Hardrar

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I spent what was supposed to have been a few days in Shrinigar on a beautiful big old house boat, we were stuck there for two weeks as the Indian army had closed the airport. We eventually had to ‘escape’ in a cab over a high mountain pass . The locals were great and are desperate for tourists for thier boats ( made and used by the British colonials when they used to come and escape from the heat of the Indian plains)..
The problem is the Indian army and it’s informers. They were the only threat I felt, the local Kashmiris were so open and generous and did everything they could to protect us.
The bazaars were fabulous , as were the the old Mughal gardens and palaces, the scenery and mountains are awesome, and make you realise that it would be an impossible place to subdue the determined Kashmiris, hence the Indians are still trying and failing so many years after partition.

The family I stayed with used to take people up into the mountains fly fishing , but the Indian army smashed all their gear and do everything they can to make visitors unwelcome and kill the tourism and keep the population pegged down.
it’s really not a happy to place to visit despite being one of the most spectacular Himalayan kingdoms, we were constantly being observed, and ushered away from dangerous encounters and I saw about a dozen corpses of poor Kashmiris that didn’t make it, and was guided away from two ‘incidents’ on Army posts, one ended in an exchange of gun fire and the other a grenade attack.
it really made me rethink what we term as terrorists, local teenage boys have no options and either escape to Indian cities to hussle arround the bazaars where they are treated as scum or are stuck in the valley watching the oppression and killing of they’re fellow Kashmiris by the Indian army.
I’m sure as a rebellious teenager I’d have probably wanted to make it as difficult as possible for the Indians too! They just want their land and life back.
Yet another stuff up of the British colonial policies and meddling I’m afraid. It’s such a shame it’s a beautiful place and beautiful people.( and I imagine the trout haven’t been bothered by a fly for many years).
Don’t know about Kashmir, but the month after the pictures above were taken on 7 Mile beach, a state of martial law was declared in Mobay 80 miles up the Coast (Montego Bay) and there was 230+ shootings in less than a month, a lot of the trouble is with ex pat Jamaicans coming back with moderate wealth from the U.K. that the locals don’t like.
The overall crime rate involving tourists is pretty low, but as a whole picture, about fourth highest in the World overall!
 
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ohanzee

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I spent what was supposed to have been a few days in Shrinigar on a beautiful big old house boat, we were stuck there for two weeks as the Indian army had closed the airport. We eventually had to ‘escape’ in a cab over a high mountain pass . The locals were great and are desperate for tourists for thier boats ( made and used by the British colonials when they used to come and escape from the heat of the Indian plains)..
The problem is the Indian army and it’s informers. They were the only threat I felt, the local Kashmiris were so open and generous and did everything they could to protect us.
The bazaars were fabulous , as were the the old Mughal gardens and palaces, the scenery and mountains are awesome, and make you realise that it would be an impossible place to subdue the determined Kashmiris, hence the Indians are still trying and failing so many years after partition.

The family I stayed with used to take people up into the mountains fly fishing , but the Indian army smashed all their gear and do everything they can to make visitors unwelcome and kill the tourism and keep the population pegged down.
it’s really not a happy to place to visit despite being one of the most spectacular Himalayan kingdoms, we were constantly being observed, and ushered away from dangerous encounters and I saw about a dozen corpses of poor Kashmiris that didn’t make it, and was guided away from two ‘incidents’ on Army posts, one ended in an exchange of gun fire and the other a grenade attack.
it really made me rethink what we term as terrorists, local teenage boys have no options and either escape to Indian cities to hussle arround the bazaars where they are treated as scum or are stuck in the valley watching the oppression and killing of they’re fellow Kashmiris by the Indian army.
I’m sure as a rebellious teenager I’d have probably wanted to make it as difficult as possible for the Indians too! They just want their land and life back.
Yet another stuff up of the British colonial policies and meddling I’m afraid. It’s such a shame it’s a beautiful place and beautiful people.( and I imagine the trout haven’t been bothered by a fly for many years).

Always fancied going to Nepal, as a child I was given a kukri by a Gurka and it stuck in my head(the gesture not the kukri :)) many years later I met Sherpa that worked in Glasgow(of family origin and was a guide) a man of huge achievement and ability but that same Nepalese total modesty, it seems that people who grow up distanced from whatever inflicts western cultures are more real and human.
 

Whinging pom

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Always fancied going to Nepal, as a child I was given a kukri by a Gurka and it stuck in my head(the gesture not the kukri :)) many years later I met Sherpa that worked in Glasgow(of family origin and was a guide) a man of huge achievement and ability but that same Nepalese total modesty, it seems that people who grow up distanced from whatever inflicts western cultures are more real and human.
Of all those Himalayan kingdoms the one I really like is Sikkim, it’s not a tourist destination like Nepal or Bhutan, people regularly walk over from Tibet and back and the Tibetan influence is really strong. ( and many of these native trekkers talk matter of factly about occasionally seeing Yeti up above the snow line).
The main towns like Gangtok are a cultural melting pot of Tibetans, Nepelese ghurkas, Indian Hindus and Muslims , and the little aboriginal Lepcha people. it’s really diverse. The food is brilliant … smoked barley porridge for breakfast, and Chiken mo mo’s at every opportunity! The road there from Darjeeling is like entering the happy valley crossing so many Ravines with crystal clear freestone rivers and teak forests. And all centring around the back drop of the worlds 3rd highest mountain the massive Kachenjunga.
I know there’s brown trout I think there maybe rainbows too, and big masheer and after writing this I’ve just decided where I’m heading next year with a fly rod and a camera.

 
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Jason 70

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Don’t know about Kashmir, but the month after the pictures above were taken on 7 Mile beach, a state of martial law was declared in Mobay 80 miles up the Coast (Montego Bay) and there was 230+ shootings in less than a month, a lot of the trouble is with ex pat Jamaicans coming back with moderate wealth from the U.K. that the locals don’t like.
The overall crime rate involving tourists is pretty low, but as a whole picture, about fourth highest in the World overall!
Sorry it's got very little to do with ex pats coming back. Gun man is gun man. Your other post with regards 'Rush Hour/Cocktail Hour' makes me chuckle. As someone who has family out in various islands, it's not all Pimm's o'clock.But I guess I'm lucky, that I don't have people waiting hand on foot for me, to pour me a drink 'In our second home'. You can travel to the interior and see the box cart mines, see Manchester and you will be fine. Try and step away from the beech old boy, you will I'm sure be ok.
 

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