Who is pretending to be me?

wrongfoot

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Dec 2, 2007
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Northumberland
I don't know about imposters, but it's good to see you back.

I copied much/all of reading rivers to a word document for offline reference, including your photos. I never shared it as it's not my content to do so with. If there's some problem and Kirsty can't restore that (excellent) thread then I could send/upload a copy for you. Appropriately credited of course.
 

Editor

Fish&Fly
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Jun 8, 2009
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Brighton, UK
Hi', Kirsty, and thanks for helping with my query. However, I do not recall ever having to sign in to FFF as guest 21. Also, if you check Reading Rivers, you will see that Guest 21 has been a member since May 17, 2006; I joined FFF in March, 2008, on Mr Trout's recommendation. I dropped out for a spell, and returned, eventually, as jada0406. I will alter my user name by inserting 19, as my parents were born in 1904 and 1906, respectively --- if that is OK with you.
I haven't checked my mail today, as I have been too busy in the garden: but thanks again, in advance. Terry Cousin.
Hi Terry,

You wouldn't have had to sign in as guest21, that was just the name that was assigned to your account when you left the site previously. The posts under that account are your posts, not an imposter. If you want me to, I can reactivate the old account but we would need to remove the jada account, so it's up to you which one you would prefer.
 

Editor

Fish&Fly
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Hi Kirsty , did you get anywhere with restoring the Lancsy Lads bunker as we had a lot of photos of our meets and other private info in that . It was lost in the new format . Thank you Noel
I did ask the developer but he didn't get back to me. I'll check with him again!
 

jada0406

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Jan 27, 2010
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Penrith, Cumbria
I still have that little book Terry that Phil did, very interesting.
Didn’t you first Publish your findings in the Herald?, I seem to remember you saying you hoped they wouldn’t mind you putting them on this forum?
I’m sure many newcomers to the sport would have found them very interesting, some good stuff in there.
S.
Hi', Steve, yes, the series on reading the water has been used three times, at reasonable intervals, to allow newcomers to fishing to learn the basics of rivercraft from the pages of the 'Herald'. I can honestly say that I have had more feedback from naturalists than anglers --- Surprising? --I don't know. I have also had a series on reading still waters published twice in the 'paper, and would have probably asked the editor of my 'stuff' to run the series again as a fill-in during 'lockdown', but it won't happen. Just before the 'paper went under administration, I had decided that I had had enough; but I was talked into submitting notes monthly, or whenever something interesting cropped up, hence the recent 'bits and pieces'.
When you get 'writers block' for the first time, after writing a weekly angling column for 54 years and 9 months, it is extremely difficult to make your efforts fresh-sounding and refreshing for readers. The quality of the fishing is no longer what it was, for me; and you will have guessed that I now spend most of my river-side time looking for hatches of river fly to match those that our generation enjoyed in the past. The Eden system has not recovered from the loss of ranunculus weed from so many of our rivers. When you lose, literally, hundreds of acres of vegetation from a river system, your hunting ground has lost a massive insect habitat. As I wrote in the 'Herald' recently, on the day the fishing restriction was lifted, I saw the biggest hatches of river flies that I have seen in the last 25 years: and on the Whinfell Park water, during a 5-hour visit, I saw only 2 fish rise. Thankfully, I had left my tackle at home. When I saw a mass of medium olives, my favourite daytime fly, on the water, after years of fruitless searching, I was quite happy simply to sit and enjoy the spectacle. If I never see another up-winged fly, that day has made my season. If there is resurgence on the move, and the classic May and June daytime dry fly fishing returns, I shall die a happy man!!
No apologies for 'going-on', flies are vital to our sport; and I sincerely hope that anyone who has the time to read this lot enjoys a productive fishing season. TerryC

PS I did ask permission to upload my series to FFF; but was told it wasn't necessary, as the copyright is mine. I reserved copyright on any poetry that I submitted to magazines in the past. Incidentally, I had a couple published in 'The Field' or 'Country Life'. One entitled 'Winderwath Geese' was about the late Mrs Pollock's flock that roosted near 'David's Pond', one field downstream from the house.
 
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wrongfoot

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Northumberland
[...] The quality of the fishing is no longer what it was , for me; and you will have guessed that I now spend most of my river-side time looking for hatches of river fly to match those that our generation enjoyed in the past. The Eden system has not recovered from the loss of ranunculus weed from so many of our rivers. When you lose, literally, hundreds of acres of vegetation from a river system, your hunting ground has lost a massive insect habitat. [...]
Do we know why the ranunculus died off and didn't recover on the Eden. I've found some studies, but they're very chalk stream focused.
 
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Mrtrout

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England.
Had some good hatches of late Terry and a bit of good sport on the Appleby waters, I don’t read the Herald anymore I’m afraid so don’t see your monthly input.
S.
 

jada0406

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Jan 27, 2010
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Location
Penrith, Cumbria
Do we know why the ranunculus died off and didn't recover on the Eden. I've fund some studies, but they're very chalk stream focused.
Hi', WF, I guess the ranunculus was choked out of existence by silt, which has been a curse on the Eden system for a long, long time. No one at the Environment Agency, or National Rivers Authority, or its 2 predecessors in Cumbria would take any notice of my comments regarding aquatic insect decline that I had observed over the whole of my time working for them as an honorary water bailiff for 25 years. I knew the senior biologist, Ray Prigg, and we were always on friendly terms, from 1974/5 until he retired; and he insisted that kick samples and Surber samples from around 1970 up to the early 20s showed no decline. When I made the point regarding ranunculus loss, adding that there was no historic record of weed samples, I got no satisfactory replies. Five important ephemeroptera species are known by biologists to prefer an aquatic vegetation habitat. Our ranunculus was heaving with larvae in high summer apart from the 5 baetid species, BWOs choose weeds and mosses -- Fontinalis is one.
At a meeting in the lecture theatre of the Nat. History Museum in March 2007, I was pleased to hear Peter Hayes -- a well-known chalk stream expert, complain about ranunculus loss in his area; and I was able to tell him during 'Question Time' how I pleased I was that someone else had linked it with insect decline. I would have said a lot more, but Jeremy Paxman, who conducted Q T , wouldn't let me!! The Riverfly Partnership programmes were part of the follow-up to that very important meeting.
Re dealing with siltation:---the forming of river bank exclusion zones should have reduced bank erosion by the presence of cattle etc; but with the sort of floods that we have seen in recent years, spending so much money on excluding stock may prove to be about as effective as peeing against the wind. There is another snag with exclusion zones, apart from being costly, they encourage the growth of G H balsam, nettles, thistles, and rosebay willowherb, and the anglers' friend, barbed wire fences washed out and strewn over the exclusion zones by the aforementioned winter floods. Of course, the offending wire is often hidden by the offending herbage, which is there as a result of the, to some people, offending zones. Hope that helps. TC
 

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