''Wild Trout & Grayling Fishing 2020''

eddleston123

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Hope this thread simplifies things for 2020 by cutting down on various titles and is intended as a replacement for thread ''Fishing for Grayling & Trout 2019/2020.

My first post is a bit of a non fishing one, as I intended to fish today, but was thwarted by the weather and the height of the river. However, I enjoyed my walk along the bank battling 45 mph winds and sleet!

Hopefully, if the weather calms down later this week I hope to get out.



Douglas
 

bobnudd

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Nice one Douglas I was thinking of doing this myself. Mind you I might have gone for Trout and Grayling fishing 2020
To encompass all Trout fishing.
 

wobbly face

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Nice one Douglas I was thinking of doing this myself. Mind you I might have gone for Trout and Grayling fishing 2020
To encompass all Trout fishing.
I thought such a thread "Trout & Grayling Fishing" would get bogged down with stockie bashing and especially for rainbows. I've no qualms about wild trout from stillwaters and again I would like stockies from rivers keep separate. Hoping not to create elitism. I find I keep wild and stockie fishing separate, different mentality and approach.
 

eddleston123

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Perhaps someone could start a Rainbow Stillwater Fishing thread. A choice of two threads would probably be a good idea.

Hope this isn't going to cause any divisions.


Douglas
 

bobnudd

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Yes fair comment. It's just as I fish for both wild and stocked Trout I was going to go for a cover all thread.
 

wobbly face

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Yes fair comment. It's just as I fish for both wild and stocked Trout I was going to go for a cover all thread.
I do the same but find if better to separate the two, more so if searching for something particular then I know which section/thread to check.
I'm happy for one thread for wild trout and grayling as both overlap during Summer into Autumn fishing and wild trout are found in both rivers and stillwaters. ;)
 

bobnudd

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Yes I'm fine with that:thumbs: There are some rivers that stock fish as well and not all stockies are Rainbows.:p
 

bobmiddlepoint

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Too b****y right! Division is the last thing we need.
It is not division it is specialisation.

Nothing wrong with different threads for different branches of the sport. I suspect in the same way I'm not interested in reading about fishing stillwaters for rainbows (I have done it but for the last ten years have lived many miles and a ferry trip from the nearest rainbow) many reservoir and small stillwater anglers don't want a thread cluttered up with obscure streams and snipe and purples!


Andy
 

Wee Jimmy

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Hope this isn't going to cause any divisions.


Douglas
No I don’t think it will, it’s only the blind ignorance of folk who look down their noses at rainbow trout or don’t appreciate the challenges they can offer that will do that for us.
 

eddleston123

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Hi Steve, (bibio1)

I'll answer your question in this new thread if that is o.k.

When I say I'll answer - I don't really know a definitive answer.

Most of the grayling anglers that I observe on the tweed work there way downstream. Some fish upstream, but not many. I suppose that grayling are not as easily spooked as trout and taking a step a cast downstream is easier to do.

I'd be interested to hear any other views, especially from anglers who fish for grayling on smaller streams - I suspect they may fish upstream. When I refer to fishing upstream, I mean fishing a cast out and taking a step upstream.


Douglas
 

wobbly face

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On small rivers and streams I tend to work up stream. On large rivers then it's more down stream. Fish across, come back and step down river then fish across again. Some people purposely shuffle their feet and kick up the bottom to disturb any invertebrates and hopefully pickup fish after the step down. Also, you get better hook ratio when fishing dries down stream to grayling because of the way they intercept the fly.
 

Andrew Rourke

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I always fish upstream. I have had it in my head for so long that I stand a better chance sneaking up on them as they face upstream also, I feel disadvantaged and my confidence goes if I try downstream methods.
I know it's not always the case but for me confidence is a huge factor.
 

mebu

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Fishing dries for trout, working upstream seems obvious to me. However, with a team of spiders, casting up at 45 degrees then swinging downstream, or when deeper wading for grayling, it is
case of working downstream. Partly because on a river like the Welsh Dee, it is extremely hard work pushing against the water.
 

bibio1st

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That’s probably why I’m kn&ckered at the end of a session on the Dee😁
I’d always worked on the sneak up behind them tactic, though most rivers I fish tend to be on the small side, one stretch more like a brook really.

Steve
 

bobnudd

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I tend to fish working up stream on the small rivers. With short casts up stream then letting the nymphs drift down and past me then lifting off slowly. Don't know about spooking them it's surprising how many Grayling take right under your feet. On larger rivers I fish across and down or slightly up stream if I want to get the flies down a bit. I just think you can cover more water that way
 

jaybeegee

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A frost tonight, river falling to near perfect winter level, a cloudy morning and gentle upstream breeze forecast. Could I be dreaming? I’ll tell you tomorrow evening..:goodcast:
B
 

eddleston123

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A frost tonight, river falling to near perfect winter level, a cloudy morning and gentle upstream breeze forecast. Could I be dreaming? I’ll tell you tomorrow evening..:goodcast:
B

Hi jaybeegee,

Conditions up my neck of the woods seem like they are going to be pretty perfect for tomorrow (as long as there is no more rain overnight).

Unfortunately, my wife is off tomorrow, so some serious compromises will have to be made!

If I get out, I will let you know as usual.



Douglas
 

black and silver

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Re: ''Wild Trout & Grayling Fishing 2020''

Hi Steve, (bibio1)

I'll answer your question in this new thread if that is o.k.

When I say I'll answer - I don't really know a definitive answer.

Most of the grayling anglers that I observe on the tweed work there way downstream. Some fish upstream, but not many. I suppose that grayling are not as easily spooked as trout and taking a step a cast downstream is easier to do.

I'd be interested to hear any other views, especially from anglers who fish for grayling on smaller streams - I suspect they may fish upstream. When I refer to fishing upstream, I mean fishing a cast out and taking a step upstream.


Douglas
When i first started for grayling, and Bronies for that mater, i always fished down stream, now my preferance is now upstream, but there are quite a few pools where i have to fish downstream due to access, this is both with nymph and Dry.
There's no right and wrong, it's all about having options and of course what you are happy with, and me personally i like the challenges of getting a fish from a very hard pool where the convetional type of fishing is'nt possible.

- - - Updated - - -

Hi Steve, (bibio1)

I'll answer your question in this new thread if that is o.k.

When I say I'll answer - I don't really know a definitive answer.

Most of the grayling anglers that I observe on the tweed work there way downstream. Some fish upstream, but not many. I suppose that grayling are not as easily spooked as trout and taking a step a cast downstream is easier to do.

I'd be interested to hear any other views, especially from anglers who fish for grayling on smaller streams - I suspect they may fish upstream. When I refer to fishing upstream, I mean fishing a cast out and taking a step upstream.


Douglas
When i first started for grayling, and Bronies for that mater, i always fished down stream, now my preferance is now upstream, but there are quite a few pools where i have to fish downstream due to access, this is both with nymph and Dry.
There's no right and wrong, it's all about having options and of course what you are happy with, and me personally i like the challenges of getting a fish from a very hard pool where the convetional type of fishing is'nt possible.

- - - Updated - - -

Good god, this post took the time it took me to make a coffee to load then it's loaded twice, think i need a lay down.
 

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